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Discrimination
Racism has been a problem since the very first day that two men of different races met. Racism is defined as "the belief in the superiority of one race over all others." Often racism is a belief that one type of person has better physical attributes, or is more intelligent. This belief can have an enormous effect over the way that one group of people treat another. In general, individual people are very friendly, but because of human actions throughout history or rivalling religious beliefs, people often see others as being a possible threat and treat every person of that race as if they were the same. The first black people to be brought to Britain were slaves. The so-called 'slave race' were taken from their home countries to Britain and America. Although slave trading was mostly common in America, It was the British that first started the slave trade. The slaves were promised the chance of a new life and promised that they would become 'good people' and Christians. They were often falsely promised education and freedom if they would leave their homelands. However, the promises where rarely delivered. People in Britain often get angry with the number of immigrants entering the UK. People and groups that are against immigrants usually claim that immigrants are taking jobs from them, these people usually have a poor knowledge and understanding of history and are unaware of why Britain has so many immigrants. After World War II Britain had the task of trying to rebuild what had been lost in the devastation of war. One avenue of the rebuild of Britain was to run public transport again. However, the Britons who had fought in the war did not want low paid jobs like driving buses or trains; they felt that they deserved something better. To combat...
pages: 6 (words: 1572)
comments: 0
added: 10/24/2011
'I have a dream… they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character…' Martin Luther King jnr. Larry Watson's thought provoking novel, 'Montana 1948,' is the retrospective tale of a childhood event told by the protagonist David Hayden, forty years later. The story evolves around the alleged professionally unacceptable behavior of a physician, David's uncle, Frank Hayden, who uses his power and privilege against a 'largely passive and benign,' as well as ultimately powerless minority group, the native American Sioux Indians. In the novel, the tragic events stem from racism, but not in the sense of 'antagonism towards other races.' The racism depicted in Montana 1948 is not literally the persecution of another race; essentially, it is the dismissal of another race. David comments that his father 'did not like Indians.' He then corrects this statement, saying, 'No, that's not exactly accurate, because it implies that my father disliked Indians, which wasn't so. He simply held them in low regard.' The Sioux Indians are deemed inferior, and therefore their concerns are ignored by the superior white society in Bentrock, resulting in the tragic death of Marie Little Soldier. Among David's primary recollections concerning the events of 1948 is the realization that Marie Little Soldier's bedroom was 'a small room off the kitchen,' despite the fact that there was a 'third bedroom' vacant on the second floor – the floor where the white people slept. 'Who decided that room should not be Marie's?' Despite the Hayden's tolerant and benevolent appearance, and their adequate treatment of Marie, they obviously are subtly influenced by the prejudice based on the belief in the superiority of a particular race. Wesley 'was not a hate filled bigot – he probably thought he was free of prejudice.' Wes was able...
pages: 4 (words: 838)
comments: 0
added: 10/25/2011
Hate based on race, religion and sexual orientation exist within any cultural rich societies. When this type of hate fuels a person into taking violent actions upon those they hate, it is called a hate crime; a topic which the American public is seriously concerned about. It has been a widely discussed subject on the media, and often debates of whether or not a crime should be attributed with hate are the center for discussion. Does hate crime imply on any case when a person is convicted for inflicting damage on someone "different"? It is often difficult to set a benchmark for measuring sufficiency of hate as a cause to label it in front of crime. The term can be conveniently stretched and squeezed by people with different ideas and biases. The four white policemen who brutally beat Rodney King Jr., a black man, half to death for merely speeding is determined by the court¡¦s judgment, as officers performing their duty. Hate, to those particular jurors and judge, was not a valid concern. To them, the beating was not due to the officers¡¦ resentment for a black man, but because they were simply disciplining an offender of the law. To the minority groups, the court¡¦s ruling was outrageous. From their point of view, the savage beating was unnecessary and hate was obviously the factor which induce the four cops to perform such a nasty feat. Because people have varying views and opinions, application of the term "hate crime" is not always relevant. Can we assume the murder of Nicole Simpson by OJ Simpson a hate crime since it involves a black man killing a white woman or are there more in depth twist to the case? People who are willing to do a little thinking, do not just look at the...
pages: 3 (words: 705)
comments: 0
added: 11/15/2011
Don't you think it's about time women are treated equally to men? Women are treated unjustly all over the world, even in the United States, but isn't the U.S. looked upon as the epitome of freedom and equality? The constitution states that all people are treated equal and it is against the law to be discriminative. Even so, women in the United States are looked upon as inferior to men. Everyone has heard million of times that women are equal to men and sexism isn't a part of our society anymore, but it is. Women are harassed and discriminated everyday and we just deal with it. Isn't it time for women to demand the same respect and opportunities as men? Sexism is everywhere, but the most common place is at work. Have you ever noticed that women don't have as high job positions that men do? We aren't given as many chances in jobs, raises, and wages like men are. An example of this is our government. There aren't half as many female representatives as there are males. Even if a woman is as able or skilled as a man is, chances are the man will get picked and paid better. Wages and job positions aren't the only acts of sexism and discrimination committed in the workplace; harassment is also a problem. Females are verbally and sexually harassed by fellow male workers and rarely is anything done about it. School is another place where sexism and discrimination is an issue. The administration usually isn't very sexist, but the males attending that school are. There is verbal abuse and sexual harassment, but everyone thinks it's all in fun. Most teenagers go along with it, without even knowing its discrimination. Even if anything is reported to the administration, nothing is done about it. Whoever...
pages: 2 (words: 537)
comments: 0
added: 11/16/2011
"In Edinburgh, a homosexual man is four times more likely to be attacked than a heterosexual man." This fact has been iterated so much by the media over the past few weeks that it would be a challenge to find one Scot who could not quote it accurately. One would think that this alarming statistic could be greatly improved if people were educated from an early age in the aspects of homosexuality, and taught, even if not to agree with it, at least to be tolerating towards it. Why, then, is there such an opposition to the repealing of Section 28 of the Local Government Act, a clause which prohibits the "promotion of homosexuality", thereby increasing homophobic prejudice, legitimising the bullying of homosexual and bisexual school pupils, and encouraging hate crimes against gays, lesbians, and bisexuals? Currently, there is a great deal of controversy concerning whether or not this law should be repealed. Is it that this law protects children or encourages ignorance and prejudice? Section 28 was invented in 1986 by the Conservative Party. The actual wording of Section 28 is as follows: A local authority shall not: (1) intentionally promote homosexuality or publish material with the intention of promoting homosexuality (2) promote the teaching in any maintained school of the acceptability of homosexuality as a pretended family relationship. Those in favour of Section 28 would argue that educating children in matters of homosexuality is morally wrong. They believe that children are extremely susceptible to what they see and hear around them, and that hearing from teachers about homosexuality would encourage them to try it for themselves. Claims have been made that children could be "turned" gay in this way. This would certainly be backed up by the unfortunate Jamie Bulger murder, where two young boys admitting to killing two-year-old Jamie after watching a violent...
pages: 4 (words: 948)
comments: 0
added: 09/18/2011
Who says discrimination doesn't exist in present day? Newspapers, television, and people all around us are methods of seeing that discrimination occurs everyday of our lives. There might be those people who say that it is extinct, but then again, do they come in contact with people outside their own race? Discrimination is something that is here with is for as long as we live. It's an issue too large to control. For one reason, people were created on this earth, no one the same, everyone different, why? Who wants to live a perfect life, life was meant to be exciting, interesting, challenging, and many other things that you want it to be, but a life isn't complete without problems. Therefore discrimination is something that will happen and always be present. Click "write my essay" to order a custom essay at WriteMyPapers.org right now! Throughout my life I have either read books, or heard something about the history of discrimination and how it was in the past. I think to myself and realize that many things have changed, but not everything. Imagine myself (a dark-skinned Hispanic) walking down the street in the city of New York. I think I'm going to feel all right, seeing and interacting with people of my color and race. This time, Imagine myself (remember, a dark-skinned Hispanic) walking down the city streets of Oklahoma for the first time ever. Sure, I get funny looks from the people walking beside me and around me, but why? Just because I look different! Things like this happen everyday not just to me but to white people in Alabama, or black people in Nashville. If you are different, you will get discriminated against. Be it looks, actions, or verbal confrontations, discrimination still exists. If we were perfect we wouldn't have...
pages: 2 (words: 319)
comments: 0
added: 04/30/2011
"Although many women feel they have blossomed in middle or old age, there are some people in our society who believe that a woman's value declines as she ages. Some employers require women workers to meet youthfulness or physical attractiveness standards. If these requirements exclude women 40 or over or are not equally applied to men, they may be illegal" (Williams). Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, employers who have at least 20 workers are not allowed to: Recruit, or ask an employment agency to send, only younger applicants; withhold training opportunities from older workers; fire or force a worker to retire because they are older (some occupations are exempt); or allow younger workers benefits such as flex time that are not given to older workers. If an employee believes they have been discriminated against on the job or while applying for a job on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, or disability, they may file a charge of discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). If the employee feels that they have been discriminated against due to age they must show that they are a member of a protected class, show adverse employment action, show that he or she was qualified for the position and show that there was dissimilar treatment (Bennett-Alexander 414). In Parrish v. Immanuel Medical Center, Mary Parrish, "a 66-year old employee resigned after being summarily transferred to a new position and after her supervisor made age-based remarks. She sued for age discrimination" (418). Parrish is over 40, which satisfied the requirement that she is a member of a protected class. The adverse employment action, which lead Parrish to resign, was assigning her to a new position without giving her a choice. Her employer claimed that she was transferred...
pages: 4 (words: 1011)
comments: 0
added: 04/30/2011
Race and Your Community Race and Your Community Axia College of University of Phoenix Cultural Diversity ETH/125 Judith Vandenberg The racial issues can very from community to community; In Hampshire, where I lived there are very few issues, because we have very few minorities that live here. The issues that we hold are between groups of people that are of the same race, just different in who we are. Just imagine coming to a place where you could have a wonderful life just to find out that people tend to look at you differently when you walk by, or go into a restaurant; you feel out of place. Then you find out there are very few people like you. So what makes this community different then other communities? Is it because in this small community almost all the people are the same; we live in a community where everyone is the same, we all look alike and talk alike, the only difference is that some have better jobs or they drive better cars than others. I had thought that there where people from all cultures living every where but I was wrong; not in this town. This town consists of almost only one race; it has more whites than any other race. This community does not have the different ethnic groups that live in most cities. Most of the places you go you will only see whites out on the streets, in the stores, at restaurants, even in the schools according to Public School Info there are 339 students enrolled at the local school with only one being of another race (Public School Info 2007). Going into a Mexican, or Chinese restaurant is the only place where you will find other cultures. According to the U.S. Census Bureau we have approximately 1247 people living in our town of...
pages: 6 (words: 1406)
comments: 0
added: 11/16/2011
Slavery originated in Africa. It was a punishment for those who broke the law. It also was part of the wars in Africa. However, slavery in Africa was more like indentured slavery. Those enslaved had a certain amount of time to serve. It was a way of putting back what was wronged. Slavery was never at the magnitude, until it got to America. When slavery first entered into America, it was more so indentured slavery. This is when people would work for their transportation over to the colonies and would be free after serving five to seven years in servitude. The colonists tried to enslave Indians also, but were unable to due to the fact when they escaped they were able to find refuge in the outskirts. Takaki, also wrote about how the Irish were indentured servants, but they had problems with them running away with black slaves and also sleeping with them. The colonist of Virginia thought that white slaves were too costly and were a high risk for flight. They decided that white indentured servants would serve their terms and receive fifty acres of land and some other attributes like a gun for their service. This was the beginning of the "peculiar institution". Once the white slaves where on their way out the colonists saw fit to enslave the blacks for life. They began to make laws that hindered slaves from all freedoms. They were considered the property of plantation owners and could be bought and sold at any time. The blacks that happened to be free were not allowed to hold office, bear arms, testify in court, or vote. Colonists put more restrictions on mixed children and whether or not they were considered black or white for the purpose of having more slaves. In my opinion, and in Takaki...
pages: 4 (words: 1086)
comments: 0
added: 11/06/2011
Gender Inequality The question on how gender inequality shapes peoples' life chances is one that has been echoing widely through minds of modern society in the recent decades. Historically sociologists have suggested, amongst various other reasons, that biological differences between men and women constitute as one of the main reasons for males having better job opportunities. Thus males were always branded the breadwinners of the family whilst a female's place was at home (Joanne Naiman 1997: 250-51). However, during the latter half of the 20th century these views began to slowly change but still stained with the ideologies from the past they still exist at the brink of the 21st century. Nevertheless, this is in a more subtle form and it is culturally reasoned to be normal and acceptable. This paper will discuss from a sociologists point of view how gender has come to determine ones future due to ideas instilled into society some time ago intervened with that of the present. Examining this from the root one can see that historically males have shaped the society in which we live. The policy-makers have almost always been male and therefore it is not surprising that our society mirrors those ideas, which exist as a result of this male-domination. For example in Joanne Naiman's book, there is an excerpt from Gustave Le Bonne, a Parisian in 1879, in which he openly compared most of the female brains with that of gorillas and stated " the inferiority (of women) is so obvious that no one can contest it for the moment; only its degree is worth discussing." (quoted in Joanne Naiman 1997: 250) Another instance closer to recent times is from Carol Travis' book titled "The Mismeasurement Of Woman". She states that in the beginning the left hemisphere of the brain was considered to deal...
pages: 5 (words: 1278)
comments: 0
added: 10/28/2011
Soccer was first brought to Brazil by the English, and at first was passed on to the Brazilian elites. As time went on every class began to play this new sport. Soccer became immensely popular and widely played. Many blacks (lower/working-class) found soccer as a way to improve their oppressed lives. On the other hand the whites (upper-class) found it as a way control the threatening lower-class energy. This view of the upper-class led them to create a commercialized soccer, in order to get the masses to play, in a way that ensured social tranquility. (This was both Liberating and Restricting.) Soccer seemed to serve the interests of every type of person. Soccer clubs were eventually formed to represent the "barrio" or district that people came from. These established teams played with a rubber ball, and made their own uniforms. For the poor these soccer clubs became a way of life, people made close friends during work and made the friendship stronger on the soccer field. The game of soccer to these people represented their lives and the hardships that they faced. This is exemplified in the idea of a "Picardia" or person who is quick witted and doesn't get kicked or hit. It showed that a lower-class person opposed to power had to weaken it or wear it out. There was a huge progression in the sport of soccer; in the beginning it represented "a material sacrifice, not a material reward." Poor players could feel things that they had never experienced before. They were still poor, but soccer made them feel valuable, like Gods. The crowd loved the players and cheered for them. In the 1920s more tangible rewards were given to these skilled soccer players. The rich factory owners who watched the games and saw the players skills,...
pages: 6 (words: 1528)
comments: 0
added: 11/18/2011
Soccer was first brought to Brazil by the English, and at first was passed on to the Brazilian elites. As time went on every class began to play this new sport. Soccer became immensely popular and widely played. Many blacks (lower/working-class) found soccer as a way to improve their oppressed lives. On the other hand the whites (upper-class) found it as a way control the threatening lower-class energy. This view of the upper-class led them to create a commercialized soccer, in order to get the masses to play, in a way that ensured social tranquility. (This was both Liberating and Restricting.) Soccer seemed to serve the interests of every type of person. Soccer clubs were eventually formed to represent the "barrio" or district that people came from. These established teams played with a rubber ball, and made their own uniforms. For the poor these soccer clubs became a way of life, people made close friends during work and made the friendship stronger on the soccer field. The game of soccer to these people represented their lives and the hardships that they faced. This is exemplified in the idea of a "Picardia" or person who is quick witted and doesn't get kicked or hit. It showed that a lower-class person opposed to power had to weaken it or wear it out. There was a huge progression in the sport of soccer; in the beginning it represented "a material sacrifice, not a material reward." Poor players could feel things that they had never experienced before. They were still poor, but soccer made them feel valuable, like Gods. The crowd loved the players and cheered for them. In the 1920s more tangible rewards were given to these skilled soccer players. The rich factory owners who watched the games and saw the players skills,...
pages: 6 (words: 1528)
comments: 0
added: 10/01/2011
Over the years many people have created groups to support their beliefs. These groups allow people with the same ideas to gather together and work out plans to advance their ideas. All of the groups that have been established have not necessarily gained a positive image from the public. One example is the Ku Klux Klan. The Ku Klux Klan originated over one hundred years ago and has gone through many eras and changes since its beginning. Although many people know the Ku Klux Klan exists, they do not understand its purpose or how it has changed throughout its life. After the Civil War ended, the Southern states went through a time known as Reconstruction. Ex-Confederate soldiers had returned home now, and they were still upset about the outcome of the war. It is at this point in time that the Ku Klux Klan became a part of everyday life for many Southerners. In the beginning the Ku Klux Klan was started to be a way for people who had the same views to spend time together. The original members meant of the Ku Klux Klan to be a "hilarious social club" that would be full of aimless fun (Invisable Empire, p.9), though in later years the Ku Klux Klan became known for their violence against people outside the white race and people who associated with them. Contrary to what most people believe, the Ku Klux Klan was started because of a few people wanted to have some innocent fun, not because they were intending to start a chain of violence on anyone outside the white race.(The Klan, p.2) The Ku Klux Klan began in Pulaski, Tennessee, a small town south of Nashville. On the night of December 24, 1865 six ex-confederate soldiers were sitting around a fireplace it the law office...
pages: 10 (words: 2533)
comments: 0
added: 10/26/2011