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Literature
The short story "Most Dangerous Game" by Richard Connell is the suspenseful tale of the ultimate hunter, one who hunts humans in a sick, twisted game of cat-and-mouse. The one of the overall themes of the story, as I personally saw it, was a warning of becoming too obsessed with a hobby and the chase for excitement. In the story Zaroff is a hunter who has been hunting for so long, and has become so adept at it, that he now finds it dull to hunt even the most dangerous animals in the world (i.e. the water buffalo, tiger, jaguar, etc.). He has resorted to trapping and hunting humans on his island, which is cleverly named "Ship-Trap Island." By hunting so many animals for so many years, Zaroff has taken the fun out of his former hobby and transformed it into an obsession. By continually seeking out greater and greater excitement in his hunts, Zaroff has destroyed his hobby and warped his mind. He has convinced himself that hunting humans is acceptable. The description of Zaroff illustrated to me a proper hunter like one would see in a movie; a proper English, in this case Cossack, gentleman hunter. The ideal physical description of General Zaroff, along with his contrasting mental state, forms, in my mind, the ideal antagonist of such a story. I envision him as a great hunter, a perfect killer of sorts. Add to this a deranged mental state, and the antagonist is born. Zaroff meets an ironic fate, however, when his quest for the "most dangerous game" leads him to face off against a fellow big-game hunter. After years chasing the ultimate hunt, Zaroff finds it in Rainsford, who is more than Zaroff can handle. This ironic twist conveyed to me that instead of chasing after the...
pages: 3 (words: 591)
comments: 0
added: 01/29/2012
The Necklace", written by Guy de Maupassant and published in 1884 is a story of an underprivileged woman named Mathilde who dreams of being rich, even if only for an evening. She borrows an ornate necklace for a special party, which she subsequently loses. She and her husband decide to take out loans and do whatever it takes for them to find the money to replace the lost necklace instead of just being honest with her friend about what happened. Her conscience effort to try to be something she is not, combined with her decision not to directly confront her friend with an explanation of her carelessness, results in her and her husband spending the next ten years of their lives trying to pay off the necklace they bought as a replacement. Various themes prevail throughout this story, including anger at the inability to determine one's own fate, pride, and deceit and despair. Mathilde is an example how women's roles were imposed upon them by the men of society and how women of the 19th century were governed by this fate. She views the necklace as a symbol of the rich and famous lifestyle she longs for. As a result, Mathilde becomes a victim of her environment while trying to reject the role that has been imposed upon her. She sees the necklace as her way of becoming the woman she longs to be, even if for just one night. Even though she longed for a more gracious life, she was destined for misery of a poor pheasant. Having been "born into a family of clerks," Mathilde fit the description of everything it meant to be discriminated against by the ruling men of society. Without the help of a man, women could not establish a lavish lifestyle such as the one...
pages: 4 (words: 1015)
comments: 0
added: 01/10/2012
Title: The Old Man and the Sea Author: Ernest Hemingway Setting: This book takes place in Cuba in the early 1940's Characters Santiago- Santiago is a wise old fisherman. He has been fishing for many years. He loves baseball and is a big fan of "The Great DiMaggio" Manolin- Manolin is a young boy who is a good friend of Santiago. He brings Santiago food when he is hungry. He fishes with Santiago almost every day. Plot Summary: Santiago has not caught a fish for 84 days but since 85 is his lucky number he has a good feeling about today. Manolin's parents will not let him go fishing with Santiago because they feel he is bad luck. They want him to fish with a different group with better luck. Santiago goes out fishing and drops his lines in the water. He hooks a huge fish and he knows it is a marlin. It drags him out to sea for three days. Santiago would use his other lines to still fish so that he could have some food. On the third day he finally caught the fish and killed it. He tied this huge marlin to the side of his skiff. As he started to head back home a shark came up and took a bite out of the marlin. Santiago killed the shark with his harpoon but also lost his harpoon while doing that. He knew that more sharks would smell the blood and try to eat the more of the marlin so he tied a knife to one of his oars to fight them off. Two more sharks came and he killed them but not until took more of the marlin. While killing the second shark his blade broke. He was determined to fight off the sharks and all he had was a club....
pages: 3 (words: 558)
comments: 0
added: 12/26/2011
For Thine is the Kingdom Many things influence us in our lives. We are influenced by our upbringing. We are influenced by what we read, see, and hear. We are also influenced by our beliefs. Graham Greene is no different. He to was influenced by all of these things. In his book The Power and the Glory, Greene writes about a Mexican priest who attempts to carry out the traditions of the Catholic Church in Mexico in the 1930's. In this historical criticism we will look at the specific things that may have influenced Greene as he wrote this book. We will begin with a look at who Greene was. Graham Green was born on October 2, 1904, in Berhamsted, Hertfordshire, England, Greene was one of six children. He attended Berhamsted public school, where his father was the headmaster. Most students harassed Greene because his father was the headmaster of the school in which he attended. He preferred reading rather than physical activity, which helped aid in his alienation. He read mostly adventure books by such authors as Rider Haggard and R. M. Ballantyne. These authors had a great impact on his method of writing. He then attended Balliol College at Oxford in 1922 where he was able to earn a Bachelors degree in modern history (Sherry 7). During his higher education, Graham became an editor for The Oxford Outlook. He then finished his first novel, Anthony Sant, and even went on to join the Communist Party. While in college, Greene was often teased and tormented by peers for playing games badly. Needless to say, because of this stress coupled with the fact that his home life was not idyllic, he became emotionally unstable and attempted to take his own life (122). Pursuant to the attempt at taking his own life and...
pages: 8 (words: 2072)
comments: 0
added: 11/22/2011
When you start your senior year of high school, you think it's going to be the greatest time of your life. You've waited thirteen years to get to this point and you're going to enjoy it to it's fullest. That's what I did. I took a bunch of the so-called "slacker classes" and then whatever else was required of me to take. I never really gave the idea of going to college much thought. I sometimes wondered what it would be like and who I would know, but I was really slow in the application process. I finally applied for Anoka-Ramsey Community College in the winter of 2002, right before Christmas break (only because the Career Center teacher, Mrs. Erzberger, told me that would be the prime time for me to get my name on the list). I turned in my application to the counseling office secretary, Mrs. Roth, and off I went to my other classes for the day. This was just the beginning of my long road to college. A month after I got back from Christmas break, I got my letter from ARCC saying, "Congratulations! You've been accepted to Anoka-Ramsey Community College. Please fill out the attached forms and send them to this address…". So, I gave the forms to my parents to look over and to fill out all the tax information. After they had sent in the forms, I got a letter back from Anoka-Ramsey saying that I had not filled out the correct information and needed to fill out another batch of forms. My parents were, nonetheless, opposed to filling out more forms. There were so many of them to fill out. This happened three consecutive times before the college O.K.'d me. Then came the financial aid packets. I applied for a loan, since I didn't...
pages: 4 (words: 985)
comments: 0
added: 11/26/2011
"The Short, Happy Life of Francis Macomber" by Ernest Hemingway is a short story overflowing with indirect references to Ernest Hemingway and his life. Through this story, Hemingway's views regarding marriage, women, and even men are made apparent. The story takes place in Africa during a safari Francis Macomber and his wife, Margaret are on. Robert Wilson is their guide, and the person that unwittingly changes the life of Francis Macomber. Francis's marriage is not one of love, but one of convenience. Margaret has cheated on him before, and proceeds to sleep with Wilson. Up to that point, Francis is playing the role of the meek and mild husband, but all that changes when he channels his anger and shoots a buffalo. This is the turning point for him and the first time he feels confident in his abilities on this safari. The story begins with a man who ran from his first lion, screaming, and ends with a man who is brave and ready to go for the kill. Margaret, sensing this newfound bravery, "accidently" shoots and kills him. The personalities of each of the characters parallel different aspects of Hemingway's life and illustrate his views. Ernest Hemingway was married four times during his life. By the time this story was written, he was on wife number two. It has been written that he was bitter towards his mother, who was rather overbearing. This attitude toward his mother carried over into all his relationships with women. He does not view women as wholesome, loving beings, but rather as "the most predatory and the most attractive" and they [women] break their men so that they "have softened or gone to pieces nervously as they have hardened"(126). Margaret's character encompasses all the qualities a man desires, and also all the qualities that...
pages: 3 (words: 715)
comments: 0
added: 11/03/2011
"Not one person telephoned the police during the assault; one witness called after the woman was dead" (Gansberg 86). Martin Gansberg's essay, "Thirty-Eight Who Saw Murder Didn't Call the Police," describes a true account of witnesses allowing the death of a neighbor and friend. In this essay Gasberg uses various techniques, including language and tone, to catch the readers attention. Martin Gansberg begins his essay by luring the reader through the use of manipulative techniques: the author attempts to make the reader angry, shows the reader an apathetic public, and also forces the reader to consider what he/she would do. "Chief Inspector Lussen said, "If we had been called when he first attacked, the woman might not be dead now,"" (Gansberg 86). Gansberg's use of this dialogue works specifically to try to make the reader furious. The author then demonstrates how much time elapses and how many times the killer leaves and returns to prove that the woman dies because no one steps in. In addition, Gansberg reveals that Miss Genovese is not a stranger to the witnesses or an unknown neighbor; she is a friend who most knew as Kitty. Still, Gansberg shows an apathetic public by emphasizing that not just one person, but several hear and even watch this heinous crime without making the effort to help. There are no calls to the police and no heroic attempts to aid, simply Gansberg asserts, because no one wants to become involved. ""We went to the window to see what was happening," he said, "but the light from our bedroom made it difficult to see the street." The wife still apprehensive, added: "I put out the light and we were able to see better,""(Gansberg 88). Gansberg's characterization of the couple reveals that they even turn out a light to accommodate their...
pages: 3 (words: 814)
comments: 0
added: 11/23/2011
Wordsworth's "Tintern Abbey" begins with the common poetical convention of vivid imagery. Noticeably, the poem is written in unrhymed verse. The words, although unrhymed, create their own beauty, in that they paint magical and mystical landscapes in the reader's consciousness. The poem then goes on to detail the fact that the scene has remained unchanged for the past five years, describing the landscape as rich and serene. There is a comfort, not only to the speaker, but also to the reader, in the landscape, and early on in the poem, a theme of solitude and hermitage is established. Later, in the second stanza, the speaker goes on to describe some of his vivid memories, transferring their image to the reader. Through the progression of memory the speaker is able to leap beyond the constraints of reality and begins to see things in a new sense, he reaches a "purer mind." The narrator begins the second stanza by sharing his memories of nature. The "beauteous forms" or memories of nature, have sustained the speaker with "sensations sweet" in "lonely rooms…of towns and cities." The speaker later goes on to describe that these memories have comforted him during the period in which he lived in an urban setting, establishing the fact that he strongly believes in the restoring power of the memory. An equally notable convention in this portion of the poem is also Wordsworth's use of the word "blood," which serves as perhaps a metaphor for the river Wye (mentioned in the poem) running through the memory of the speaker as well. Later, the speaker begins to question his own belief in the restoring power of the memory, but goes on to turn to the ruins of the abbey in solace, going on to relate his love of nature as being more mature...
pages: 3 (words: 611)
comments: 0
added: 01/26/2012
Do you agree that a poem charts a developing thought? Base your answer on the poems "To autumn" and "To a skylark"! In the two poems "To autumn" by Keats and "To a skylark" by Shelley, we can see a similar type of idea, the idea of a developing chart. The poets are exploring their thoughts and are developing emotions. Both poets are reconstructing an argument, a train of consciousness. In "To autumn", Keats is describing the beauty and ripeness of autumn and is relating that to life and the time passing by. Shelley is describing an even wider range in "To a skylark". He is showing the beauty, the energy and the absolute joy of a skylark, relating to his feelings about it. I will start with "To autumn". In this poem, Keats is describing his interpretation of autumn, the season of beauty and ripeness. He relates the poem to life, watching the time passing by. This already begins in the first verse. Keats is talking about the fruitfulness, a symbol of growing and freshness. "The maturing sun" shows us, that Keats does not mean heat, but the sun, that made things grow, becoming beautiful and creating the base of a wonderful and green world. The autumn is the time, when you reap the fruits for the vine. They are ripe and especially tasty and their colours are bright and strong. Moreover he is talking about the ripeness of the fruit in general, that this clime of autumn fills the fruits with ripeness to the core, so that the whole fruit is tasty and beautiful. Here, Keats is playing with the senses of taste and touch. You can really feel the atmosphere, the warmth of the sun, the smell of fresh landscape and taste the ripeness of all kind of fruits. Keats is also writing about the plants. The summer with...
pages: 9 (words: 2243)
comments: 0
added: 11/28/2011
KRISTI BOEKER MARCH 27, 2003 4TH HEMOPHILIA RESEARCH PAPER HEMOPHILIA IS A HEREDITARY DISEASE, IN WHICH THE BLOOD'S ABILITY TO CLOT IS MARKEDLY IMPAIRED. WHEN A NORMAL PERSON RECEIVES A CUT OR OTHER INJURY, BLOOD FLOWING FROM THE DAMAGED BLOOD VESSELS RAPIDLY FORMS A CLOT THAT SERVES TO STOP THE BLEEDING. WHEN A HEMOPHILIAC RECEIVES A CUT OR OTHER INJURY, HE MAY BLEED FOR HOURS OR EVEN DAYS. ALTHOUGH SOME HEMOPHILIACS LIVE FAIRLY NORMAL LIVES, OTHERS ARE SEVERLY DEBILITATED AND MANY DIE PREMATURELY. THIS DISEASE AFFECTS MOSTLY MALES. WOMEN WITH A BLEEDING DISORDER MAY HAVE FREQUENT MISCARRIAGES, ESPECIALLY DURING THE FIRST TRIMESTER. DISEASES IN THIS CATEGORY INCLUDE HEMOPHILIA AHEMOPHILIA BVON WILLEBRAND'S DISEASE. THERE ARE TWO BASIC TYPES OF HEMOPHILIA. IN HEMOPHILIA A, WHICH IS ALSO CALLED CLASSICAL HEMOPHILIA, A PARTICULAR BLOOD CLOTTING FACTOR, KNOWN AS THE ANTHEMOPHILIC GLOBULIN, AHG, OR FACTOR VIII, IS ABSENT OR GREATLY DIMINISHED. IN HEMOPHILIA B, A DIFFERENT CLOTTING FACTOR, CALLED PLASMA THROMBOPLASTIN COMPONENT, PTC, OR FACTOR IX, IS LACKING OR DEFICIENT. HEMOPHILIA B IS SOMETIMES CALLED CHRISTMAS DISEASE, AFTER THE FAMILY NAME OF THE FIRST PATIENT WHO WAS FOUND TO HAVE THIS TYPE OF HEMOPHILIA. BOTH HEMOPHILIA A AND HEMOPHILIA B ARE INHERITED DISEASES THAT ARE TRANSMITTED FROM ONE GENERATION TO THE NEXT BY A RECESSIVE GENE LOCATED ON THE X CHROMOSOME, ONE OF THE TWO SEX CHROMOSOME. BECAUSE MEN HAVE ONLY ONE X CHROMOSOME, THE EFFECT OF A RECESSIVE GENE ON THE CHROMOSOME CANNOT BE COUNTERBALANCED, AND NEARLY ALL HEMOPHILIACS ARE MALES. WOMEN HAVE TWO X CHROMOSOMES, SO THAT EVEN IF A WOMAN CARRIES A GENE FOR HEMOPHILIA ON ONE X CHROMOSOME, IT IS VERY LIKELY THAT HER OTHER X CHROMOSOME WILL CARRY A GENE FOR NORMAL BLOOD CLOTTING, AND THE NORMAL GENE, WHICH IS DOMINANT, WILL PREVENT HER FROM HAVING THE DISEASE. HEMOPHILIA, THEN, IS EXTREMELY RARE IN...
pages: 4 (words: 1016)
comments: 0
added: 12/02/2011
Write About the ways in which Harper Lee creates tension, drama and humour in chapter 15 of To Kill A Mockingbird. The atmosphere created in chapter 15 is tense and dramatic from the first paragraph. The introductory paragraph to chapter 15 ends with "A nightmare was upon us." This obviously tells us that an event of an unpleasant nature is yet to occur. The second paragraph starts with "It began one evening." This tells us that the nightmare is beginning, and builds us up for the chapter. Harper Lee uses various methods to create drama, tension and humour in chapter 15, many of which are discussed below. The chapter begins by setting a normal scene. Harper Lee perhaps does this to contrast the abnormalities of the days following. Harper Lee has knows that the week may have been normal to Scout, but to the reader it is not, so the setting is described in much detail in order to bring the scene alive and present a vivid contrast. This builds us up for the drama to come, and also encourages us to connect with the characters of the book, and their habits. Harper Lee does this by presenting us with the children's familiarities, showing us that they were average children who occupied their time with typical activities such as building a ladder for the tree house. She donates humour to the paragraph by describing to us Dill's idea of placing a trail of lemon drops outside Boo Radley's house, causing him to emerge and follow the trail like an ant. Scout describes this as a 'foolproof plan' which may be sincere through Scout's eyes, but we know that Harper Lee is being ironic, and using the children's innocent and naïve perspectives of the world to bring humour. The children's lack of understanding...
pages: 8 (words: 2062)
comments: 0
added: 11/23/2011
The novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, by the American author Harper Lee, is about how society kills innocence with evil. The setting of the book takes place in the 1950's, where racism was a big deal to society. Throughout the novel, Lee uses a mockingbird as a analogy to the characters, which makes the title so convenient to the novel. If we were to view a bird's world, blue jays would be viewed as the bullies. They are loud, territorial, and aggressive. The blue jays represent the prejudice "bullies" in Maycomb and society. The mockingbird is a symbol for two of the characters in the novel: Boo (Arthur) Radley and Tom Robinson. The mockingbird symbolizes these two character because they do not have their own songs. Whereas, the blue jay is loud and obnoxious, the mockingbird only sings other birds songs. If a mockingbird does not sing its own song, we characterize it only by what the other birds sing. We see the mockingbird through the other birds. In the novel, the people of Maycomb only know Boo Radley and Tom Robinson by what others say about them. These characters do not really have their own "song" in a sense and are therefore, characterized by other people's viewpoints. Boo Radley, one of the well known symbolized mockingbirds, show how a good person can be injured by the evil of mankind. Boo a character who never steps foot outside of his house, nor maintain any relation with the people of Maycomb; causes people to fear him and make up stories about him without even getting a chance to know him. Mainly prejudice like this is what keeps Boo in his house. In the novel, Scout connects Boo with the mockingbird. Mrs. Maudie defines a mockingbird as one who "don't do one thing...
pages: 4 (words: 923)
comments: 0
added: 10/01/2011
Susan Glaspell's "Trifles" The nineteenth century produced several prominent female literary writers. Like many other women writers, Glaspell dealt with issues such as gender differences and inherited a rich legacy from the women of the nineteenth century. In Greenwich Village, Glaspell and her husband wrote openly about many controversial issues (Smith 179). In 1915 Glaspell started the Provincetown Players. Glaspell's involvement in the Provincetown Players strongly influenced the writing of the play Trifles by introducing her to new people and ideas as well as maturing her writing. Susan Glaspell is an example of a late nineteenth-century female writer. She "came of age" the same time American writing moved to modernism and she helped found the modern movement in American writing (Carter 247). She went through different stages of writing, but eventually returned to fiction and to her earlier ideas. No one knows what caused her to retreat back to her original way of writing. The history behind the writing of this play is interesting. It was based off of an actual trial in the Midwest. After graduating from college, Glaspell took a position at the Des Moines Daily News when the horrible murder occurred (Warterman 54). Glaspell wrote the play after she had moved away from the Midwest, married, and moved to Provincetown. In a sense, the play was written for a midwestern audience to describe the hard life of a farmer's wife, lonely and solely dependent on her husband for all of her needs. She was able to transform a factual story into a fascinating drama of despair, loneliness and tragedy. She used her experiences as a reporter in Des Moines, Iowa, her own life and her feminist ideals to change her genre from fiction to drama. She is best known for the play Trifles. Susan Glaspell is a somewhat of a hero...
pages: 5 (words: 1372)
comments: 0
added: 10/14/2012
Walking Through Hell Pablo Neruda's poem "Walking Around" displays a horrid look at society from a struggling class side in a communist light. Neruda uses personal accounts to describe an angry view on democracy and similar forms of government through tactical metaphors. Repetition helps create a dark feeling inside the speaker's head, similar to a depressed line of thought. The speaker feels sickened by the human race's destruction of the world and morality. He feels that the government has destined his life to be their tool and his desire not to be pulls him through each day. Thoughts of overcoming these obstacles are tightly pressed for he sees himself as just one man. Neruda concludes his character trudging on in reality; with hope that one day he will be more than just one man and they can overcome barriers created by their government. In the first stanza we learn that the speaker feels like human life is a complete run-down and would like nothing more than to escape its walls. The first line states, "It happens that I am tired of being a man" (1). He continues, "It happens that I go into tailor's shops and the movies/ all shriveled up, impenetrable, like a felt swan/ navigating on a water of origin and ash" (2-4). As he follows the steps of his life, the speaker is dragged down by materialism and feels fake next to it. The entertainment industry's exploitations and exaggerations cause him to feel empty. He is moving through the sweat of the past to a future he hopes isn't inevitable. The last line can also be related to the sea of the government, controlling entertainment and merchandise, which encompasses so much of the world. The second stanza holds a better view of how Neruda's poem represents intense emotions against government...
pages: 7 (words: 1902)
comments: 0
added: 01/16/2012
Fear can be a self-destructive emotion if people let it overwhelm them. First Class Private Paul Berlin is new to war. He does numerous things to keep his mind from being afraid. These things include pretending he is not in the war, pretending he is a little boy again camping with his father. He is imagining what he is going to tell his parents about the war, counting his steps, singing, and even laughing. But in the end, he is unable to cease his fear. In the story "Where Have You Gone, Charming Billy?," by Tim O'Brien, the three main literary elements are theme, irony, and setting because it shows the true meaning of Paul's fear. In "Where Have You Gone, Charming Billy?," one of the main themes is that fear alone can kill you. For example, in attempt to explain to the soldiers that Billy Boy did not die from stepping on the mine, Doc Peret states, "you see, Billy Boy really died of a heart attack. He was scared he was gonna die- so scared he had himself a heart attack- and that's what really killed him. I seen it before" (202). This shows that Billy Boy's own fear killed him. Because he was unable to believe that the wound wasn't going to kill him, and that the war was over, he gave himself a heart attack. In addition, when Private First Class Paul Berlin could not stop laughing over the thought of what had happened to Billy Boy he realized "the giggles were caught in his throat, drowning him in his own laughter: scared to death like Billy Boy" (203). This reveals that Paul's laughter was a result of his own fear. No matter how hard he tries, Paul cannot stop being afraid. Sometimes, even knowing the consequences,...
pages: 2 (words: 308)
comments: 0
added: 02/01/2012
Who am I? During all of high school, It seemed as if I were hiding behind a mask. When I was at home I was a totally different person. At school I was trying to be a person who could fit in, but the more I tried the more it didn't seem to work. Everywhere I went I would censor what I said depending on my surroundings and the people that were with me. Most of the time I would not say anything at all because I was afraid of being embarrassed. I would always have to change my mood when different people were around me. It was horrible; I hated it. I was getting sick and tired of always being someone I was not. It was about the middle of the summer of 1999, after my first year, that I realized that being two different people was the worst thing that I could have done to myself and that I did have other options. Around that time, a major influence on my life was my best friend, Tony. He taught me that I would only live once and that I should be the person that I was and not someone that just tries to fit in. We were sitting in a coffee shop one evening when he asked me the one question that changed my life. "Who are you?" When I first heard this question I hesitated to answer. This question opened a new door in my mind that had never been opened before. This was the first question that had actually made me think about myself and who I was. The more I thought about his question the more I realized that I had a decision to make; to be the person who tried to fit in and cared what...
pages: 2 (words: 433)
comments: 0
added: 12/10/2011
In the short story "Why I Live at the P.O.", author Eudora Welty creates a "grim comedy" in which what happens to the characters immediately seem to be funny but in the end cause them to have a destructive ending. Welty borrows from her own life experiences from being raised in the South to develop a story in which a comic character lives their own sad destructive life in the South. Welty "presents the distortions of life in the context of the ordinary… feminine nonsense-family life, relatives, conversations, eccentric old people- and a sharp, penetrating eye for the seams of this world, through which a murderous light shines."(Oates 54-7) Welty was born in Jackson, Mississippi on April 13, 1909. Her parents were from the North; her father from Wisconsin and her mother from Virginia. As a child she was fond of reading and love writing. She had many pieces published in children's magazines as a preteen. She went to Mississippi State College for women for two years but then transferred to the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she got her B.A. in English. She then briefly attended Columbia in New York. She then returned to Mississippi in 1931. After returning to Mississippi, she took up a job writing to society news for a popular newspaper, Later she took on a job traveling Mississippi as a "junior publicity agent" promoting in remote and rural areas of the state. Welty's writing is not easily categorized. Due to her wide range of talent and interests, she writes in both subject and narrative terms and has produced a varied body of work. A majority of Welty's work takes place in the South during the Great Depression. Place is important in a story because the authors felling tend to be associated with it. Since Welty was raised...
pages: 5 (words: 1193)
comments: 0
added: 11/01/2011
Catcher in the Rye By: J.D. Salinger "You cannot open a book without learning something." This Irish proverb is correct in meaning. As I read Catcher in the Rye, much learning took place. The story was easy to understand and explained realistic experiences that have taken place in my life. This book provided me with some knowledge of myself. As Holden Caufield was telling the story, it reminded me of my past. I believe that I can truly relate to the narrator. The experiences he undergoes in school, were very similar to the time when I attended private school. I was close to everyone, but I did not like some of the people that I had acquainted with. I could not approach those classmates because I did not want to cause trouble. As a result, I dealt with the misery of talking to those that I disliked. During this time, I was very judgmental towards others. Fortunately, I learned to judge others less and tolerate people's flaws. Throughout the story I also learned about the environment and the people who made up society during that time period. The setting of the story and the setting of today does not completely differ. The people in those years were very similar to some of the people in today's society. For instance, parents would be very disappointed if their child was expelled from school, but they usually always support the child no matter what circumstance. Although Holden had already attended a couple of schools in a short period of time, his parents helped him and as a result, he was to start a new school at the end of the story. In the book, the world was a significant factor to the narrator. Without the world, he would not be able to live, nor be the person he...
pages: 2 (words: 482)
comments: 0
added: 10/31/2011
The Traditional Approach 1.) Nathaniel Hawthorne was born in Salem Massachusetts in 1804. Hawthorn was also a descendant of Puritan ancestors, one of which being a judge responsible for the Salem witch trials. Therefore the combination of Hawthorn's family history and the given history of his birthplace, helped influences his choice for maintaining a Puritan New England type setting for much of his literary works. 2.) King William "And yet, though the elder person was as simply clad as the younger, and as simple in manner too, he had an indescribable air of one who knew the world, and would not have felt abashed at the governor's dinner-table, or in King William's court, were it possible that his affairs should call him thither."(Paragraph 12,Hawthorne) Within Hawthorne's work, he has made reference to King William. King William was a distinguished respectable man, hence by Comparing Goodman Brown to him suggests that he is also a man of great honour. Likewise, King William became king of England in 1685, after the invasion of Parliament causing James II to run to France. William was a strong rival of the French and their expansion. Under William's jurisdiction the transition occurred from personal government of the House of Stuart to the parliamentary rule of the house of Hanover. King Philips War "And it was I that brought your father a pitch-pine knot, kindled at my own hearth, to set fire to an Indian village, in King Philip's war." (Paragraph 17, Hawthorne) King Philips War was another historical event that the author Hawthorne had made reference to in the duration of his short story. By referring to the killing of the natives, suggests discrimination and hatred towards the group. Thus, Hawthorne was conveying the evil that the Puritans are capable of. King Philips War occurred during 1675-1676. As colonists continued to immigrate to...
pages: 6 (words: 1424)
comments: 0
added: 12/01/2011
'The Wave' does not have little to offer for readers. Many examples of lessons are taught to the readers. There are endless reasons for why 'The Wave' had a lot to offer, many lessons on individualism are taught. 'The Wave' is compared on the historical beliefs of Nazism and varieties of cults. Many examples of issues that are happening in Australia that raise in 'The Wave' such as power and conformity. The author makes a strong parallel with the rise of Nazism. The author asks you to find links between 'The Wave' and the rise of Nazi Germany, when 10% of Germans in the Nazi Party were instrumental in the deaths of 10 million men and children in gas chambers, while the rest of the population either did not know, or chose to ignore it. 'The Wave' also teaches issues on the effects of starting and constructing a cult. A leader of a cult may start to diffuse thoughts of raising a cult, bringing up the moral values of which they are trying to achieve. A resplendent example to be found history in relation to leader's of cults is The Nazi's under the leadership of Adolf Hitler. As Adolf Hitler gained more and more support he gained more and more power. He used this power to carry out tasks, which he thought would bring Germany to an uprise. The power and danger of such a cult is clear as it took several countries to defeat Hitler's organization. In this case, 'The Wave', offers some very good lessons about what power can cause humans to do. This is clear when Ben Ross admits that he enjoyed and became absorbed and some what obsessed with the power he obtained when creating The Wave. Consider events and controversies happening in Australia today to start you...
pages: 2 (words: 546)
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added: 01/21/2012
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