1 Essays on Medical School at EssayPedia.com
Subcategories
Contact us
Toll-free for US only: 1-866-509-5959 Order custom essays:
Instant Quote
Urgency:
Degree:
Type of work:
Pages:
275 words/page
Price: $0
Make an order
Our Prices
14 days per page
10 days per page
6 days per page
3 days per page
2 days per page
24 hours per page
12 hours per page
6 hours per page
3 hours per page
Note: The prices are given for High School academic level. Please, visit "Prices" page for the detailed prices.
Medical School
I felt fortunate to awaken from my weeks-long life-threatening coma in the Zimbabwe orphanage in which I was raised from infancy, until I realized the building was ablaze. After evacuating all the inhabitants including any stray insects who were drawn to the flames, I doused the fire with a water pump I had improvised from an old accordion bellows (on which I often played Bach fugues a la Albert Schweitzer) and a bamboo-like plant I had discovered in the jungle. I named the plant Medusa Abandona after my now forgiven American born mother, who forsook me in my cradle, only after it turned out to be an unknown genus and promised to have exciting anti-cancer medicinal qualities as well. When I was convinced that everyone in the orphanage was safe, I escaped the holocaust in the solar powered wheel chair I had developed to give myself more mobility after the unfortunate accident I had as a child, breaking my seventh vertebra while wrestling a lion that had terrorized the village. When I was seven, the only doctor within a 300 mile radius took me under his wing. I shadowed him for ten years, which was quite difficult when you consider the dense jungle foliage and lack of sunlight at ground level. The fact that he was a witch doctor should in no way denigrate his skills nor the efficacy of his spells. If you accept me into your next medical class, I intend to teach my fellow students a series of hexes that will eliminate the need for Viagra, Allegra, Grecian Formula and Formula 409. Most of my adolescence I spent draining swamps, eliminating mosquitoes and generally reducing the malarial plague in three contiguous countries in equatorial Africa. It was only after saving the lives of ten's of thousands of people that...
pages: 3 (words: 586)
comments: 0
added: 01/16/2012
The AIDS hospice reeked from disease and neglect. On my first day there, after an hour of "training," I met Paul, a tall, emaciated, forty-year-old AIDS victim who was recovering from a stroke that had severely affected his speech. I took him to General Hospital for a long-overdue appointment. It had been weeks since he had been outside. After waiting for two and a half hours, he was called in and then needed to wait another two hours for his prescription. Hungry, I suggested we go and get some lunch. At first Paul resisted; he didn't want to accept the lunch offer. Estranged from his family and seemingly ignored by his friends, he wasn't used to anyone being kind to him — even though I was only talking about a Big Mac. When it arrived, Paul took his first bite. Suddenly, his face lit up with the biggest, most radiant smile. He was on top of the world because somebody bought him a hamburger. Amazing. So little bought so much. While elated that I had literally made Paul's day, the neglect and emotional isolation from which he suffered disgusted me. This was a harsh side of medicine I had not seen before. Right then and there, I wondered, "Do I really want to go into medicine?" What had so upset me about my day with Paul? Before then nothing in my personal, academic, or volunteer experiences had shaken my single-minded commitment to medicine. Why was I so unprepared for what I saw? Was it the proximity of death, knowing Paul was terminal? No it couldn't have been. As a young boy in gutted Beirut I had experienced death time and time again. Was it the financial hardship of the hospice residents, the living from day to day? No, I dealt with...
pages: 4 (words: 1083)
comments: 0
added: 12/02/2011
"Mom, I've decided I'm not going to medical school." As the gravity of my words sank into the ensuing silence, my intuition told me that they fell on deaf ears. Indeed, it would be a full two months and $200 in university long distance service bills until the finality of my decision not to apply to medical school had been adequately communicated. It shocks me to realize that it has been five years since I made that phone call, which I recall so vividly. However, in these five years I've traveled the world and had the opportunity to serve and learn from destitute villagers in India, I've achieved a master's degree in neuropharmacology, I've lived through the painful discovery that my brother has an as-yet incurable neurodegenerative disorder—multiple sclerosis (MS), and I have come full circle to realize that there was a physician inside of me all along whom I am passionately excited to cultivate. As a child, it seemed like I was destined for medicine. For my mother, it might as well have been ingrained in my DNA. Ever since I could walk, I had been in and out of hospitals volunteering, observing, interacting and learning from the doctors and patients. Throughout high school I worked in two family practice clinics, a gastroenterology lab and in a surgeon's office. I'd taken patient histories and chief complaints, removed post-op stitches, scrubbed in and assisted in ER and outpatient OR procedures. When I entered college at the University of Southern California, I breezed through 2 years of pre-medical coursework without thinking twice about my de jure destiny. Then in my 3rd undergraduate year, I revolted. A sense of individuality grew inside of me, and with it an intense desire to carve out my own place in the world, to find myself, to become a...
pages: 4 (words: 1008)
comments: 0
added: 01/11/2012
Emergency 911 – The Two Faces of Urban Medicine "Call 911!" I shouted to my friend as I sprinted down the street. The young Caucasian male had been thrown fifteen yards from the site of impact and surprisingly was still conscious upon my arrival. "My name is Michael. Can you tell me your name?" In his late twenties, he gasped in response as his eyes searched desperately in every direction for help, for comfort, for assurance, for loved ones, for death, until his eyes met mine. "Flail chest", I thought to myself as I unbuttoned his shirt and placed my backpack upon his right side. "Pulse 98, respiration 28 short and quick. Help is on the way. Hang in there buddy." I urged. After assessing the patient, the gravity of the situation struck me with sobriety. The adrenaline was no longer running through my veins — this was real. His right leg was mangled with a compound fracture, and his left leg was also obviously broken. The tow-truck that had hit him looked as though it had run into a telephone pole. Traffic had ceased on the six-lane road, and a large crowd had gathered. However, no one was by my side to help. "Get me some blankets from that motel!" I yelled to a bystander and three people immediately fled. I was in charge. The patient was no longer conscious; his pulse was faint and respiration was low. "Stay with me, man!" I yelled. "15 to 1, 15 to 1", I thought as I rehearsed CPR in my mind. Suddenly he stopped breathing. Without hesitation, I removed my T-shirt and created a makeshift barrier between his mouth and mine through which I proceeded to administer two breaths. No response. And furthermore, there was no pulse. I began CPR. I continued...
pages: 4 (words: 871)
comments: 0
added: 11/03/2011
My earliest impression of medicine occurred when my mother repeatedly required the assistance of physicians in dealing with her chronic migraine headaches. Her doctors were always there for her, day or night. The respect that my parents bestowed on doctors, and the doctors' ability to ease suffering, sparked a desire to one day become a physician myself. This was an ambitious goal for someone coming from a family in which no one had obtained a professional degree. However, my traditional family-oriented culture, emphasizing doing good for others, contributed to this decision to pursue a career in the medical field. Furthermore, the American individualistic spirit gave me the confidence and opportunity to undertake a challenging medical career. I also had the chance to gain some firsthand experience in the medical profession when I volunteered for over a year in the emergency room of a regional hospital. From my volunteer experience, I learned the importance of organization and effective communication skills, and I was exposed to the diversity that exists in my community. It has also demonstrated to me why the American health-care system is the best in the world; I saw some knowledgeable minds using some very sophisticated equipment. But I also saw many ways it can be improved. For example, uninsured homeless and immigrant people would often come in, complaining of problems they had been having for a long time. Although we would treat these people as best we could, a health-care system that intervenes in such sicknesses earlier would have minimized costs associated with treating diseases in their later stages. As a doctor, I hope to participate in these changes in order to benefit more people than are currently being served. Doctors should be able to serve people of all different races, ages, backgrounds, and cultures. I intend to use my...
pages: 2 (words: 318)
comments: 0
added: 01/11/2012
Martial arts and medicine. They seem worlds apart, but they both have played significant roles in my life and for reasons that are surprisingly similar. They both offer challenge, require great discipline, and necessitate a goal-oriented approach. I first became involved with the martial arts when I was only 13 years old. At that time I began studying karate in my hometown in northern California. Even then I was a goal-oriented individual who was attracted to the step-by-step progression involved in studying karate. Within a year I had earned a brown belt (the next-to-highest ranking) and was actually serving as an instructor at the karate academy where I had learned the sport. Dedication, discipline, and physical and mental prowess were behind my success, which included being the youngest person in the area to attain the brown belt. In college I became involved in Tae Kwon Do, the Korean counterpart of karate. This sport, too, requires patience, determination, and a clear mind in addition to physical strength, endurance, and agility. Within a year I had become president of my university's 80-member Tae Kwon Do club, which ranks among the top sports clubs on campus. In assuming this position I began to have the opportunity to test myself as a leader as well as an athlete. One of the reasons I became interested in medicine is that it, too, requires a meticulous, goal-oriented approach that is very demanding. Of course, it also happens that the substance of the profession holds strong appeal for me, both in terms of the science and the potential for serving others who are in need. Most of my exposure to the profession has occurred within the areas of surgery and emergency medicine. After first serving as an emergency medicine volunteer technician at a northern California hospital (where I had a moving...
pages: 3 (words: 636)
comments: 0
added: 10/07/2011
As a potential medical student, I will strive to be a tremendous asset to The Chicago Medical School by devoting all my time and life to becoming an excellent physician. I believe that I am obligated to use my talents in a constructive manner, in a manner that benefits society. The medical career gives me the unique opportunity to express my many talents while benefiting human life. B. Berston M.D. once said: “ ... a funny thing happens to medical students on their way to becoming physicians: they forget how to hold a conversation." I believe that my ability to communicate makes me well suited to pursue a medical career. While I possess the strong science background necessary for success in the profession, I also consider myself a “ people" person. As a waiter and bartender, I dramatically improved and expanded my communication skills since I was constantly meeting new people and discussing different topics. Because people constantly disclosed their personal issues to me as a bartender, I learned to become not only a good conversationalist, but also an excellent listener. In medical school, I also plan to pursue side work educating students and serving as a resource to the public. One of my most rewarding experiences has been tutoring high school students in math, physics, and biology, and helping people in my choir learn Byzantine music. Always able to develop a good rapport with students, I believe I possess a talent for teaching others in a friendly manner and in a manner that helps them to grasp difficult concepts easily. As part of my medical career, I will aim to continue teaching and to provide information to the public on the prevention and treatment of ailments and diseases. Undoubtedly my cultural diversity will be a great contribution to The Chicago Medical School....
pages: 3 (words: 663)
comments: 0
added: 12/10/2011
firmly believe in the powerful message of Ecclesiastes 3:1, which states that every endeavor man can undertake has its own time and meaning. Looking back on my own life, I see these different seasons as stages of growth that have helped me to understand my own potential and the path that I wish to take in life. I feel that I have lived deeply and fully, and now wish to apply the valuable life lessons I have gained to what I feel is my true calling. Now is the season to explore the fascinating world of medicine, and to finally make that dream a reality. As a child, I never believed that I could succeed. Growing up in one foster home after another, I lacked the stability that a youth needs in order to excel in classes and build a proper foundation for the future. I was pregnant by the age of eighteen, and dropped out of school to try to forge a future for my children. Life was difficult but fulfilling, and I found much joy in being the mother of two lovely children. The day my second child was diagnosed with Krabbe’s disease, however, all of my happiness seemed to vanish before my very eyes. Krabbe’s disease is both terminal and debilitating, and the doctors gave my daughter a life expectancy of eighteen months. Swallowing my shock and sorrow, I devoted myself to making the most of the precious time I had left with my child. I researched intensively on Krabbe’s disease, learning as much as I could about its mechanisms and the course it would run. I applied these lessons to caring for my daughter, and provided her with the twenty-four hour a day care that she required. Because I was afraid she would die at any moment, I...
pages: 5 (words: 1140)
comments: 0
added: 12/05/2011
Georgetown Medical School Admissions Essay Aside from my older sister who is a nurse anesthetist, no one in my family has been in the medical or other health professions. In fact, I came to college thinking that I would probably follow something similar to my father's career. He is a professor of chemistry at Penn State. When I arrived as a freshman I began as a physics major and, following the advice of my faculty advisor, restricted my extracurricular activities until I had completed my first semester. In my second semester I took up some activities outside of classes, among these was the opportunity to work at a free clinic in downtown Washington. After getting past the initial shock of discovering how poor the health and nutrition practices are among many of our city's people, I was personally gratified to find that even with so little training and acting in a subordinate position I could make a real difference in the health of the people I came there to help. By the end of the semester the doctors in charge of the clinic were giving me instructions on taking medical histories, looking for emergency symptoms, performing some of the routine tests and assisting in some of the clinical procedures. That summer I decided to test my academic interests related to medicine and so I took a zoology course at Penn State. The lab work was what I liked best and upon returning to Georgetown in the fall I switched to a biology major and began to set my sights on medical school. I have continued to work at the free clinic and have been active in recruiting and training volunteers but I have also restricted the time I give to that work since it was clear to me and to anyone who...
pages: 2 (words: 519)
comments: 0
added: 12/27/2011
Medical School Admissions Essay: Why pursue a medical career? As a potential medical student, I will strive to be a tremendous asset to The Chicago Medical School by devoting all my time and life to becoming an excellent physician. I believe that I am obligated to use my talents in a constructive manner, in a manner that benefits society. The medical career gives me the unique opportunity to express my many talents while benefiting human life. B. Berston M.D. once said: “ ... a funny thing happens to medical students on their way to becoming physicians: they forget how to hold a conversation." I believe that my ability to communicate makes me well suited to pursue a medical career. While I possess the strong science background necessary for success in the profession, I also consider myself a “ people" person. As a waiter and bartender, I dramatically improved and expanded my communication skills since I was constantly meeting new people and discussing different topics. Because people constantly disclosed their personal issues to me as a bartender, I learned to become not only a good conversationalist, but also an excellent listener. In medical school, I also plan to pursue side work educating students and serving as a resource to the public. One of my most rewarding experiences has been tutoring high school students in math, physics, and biology, and helping people in my choir learn Byzantine music. Always able to develop a good rapport with students, I believe I possess a talent for teaching others in a friendly manner and in a manner that helps them to grasp difficult concepts easily. As part of my medical career, I will aim to continue teaching and to provide information to the public on the prevention and treatment of ailments and diseases. Undoubtedly my cultural diversity will be...
pages: 3 (words: 678)
comments: 0
added: 12/10/2011
The Non-Traditional Applicant Modest one-room houses lay scattered across the desert landscape. Their rooftops a seemingly helpless shield against the intense heat generated by the mid-July sun. The steel security bars that guarded the windows and doors of every house seemed to belie the large welcome sign at the entrance to the ABC Indian Reservation. As a young civil engineer employed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, I was far removed from my cubical in downtown Los Angeles. However, I felt I was well-prepared to conduct my first project proposal. The project involved a $500,000 repair of an earthen levee surrounding an active Native American burial site. A fairly inexpensive and straightforward job by federal standards, but nonetheless I could hardly contain my excitement. Strict federal construction guidelines laden with a generous portion of technical jargon danced through my head as I stepped up to the podium to greet the twelve tribal council members. My premature confidence quickly disappeared as they confronted me with a troubled ancient gaze. Their faces revealed centuries of distrust and broken government promises. Suddenly, from a design based solely upon abstract engineering principles an additional human dimension emerged — one for which I had not prepared. The calculations I had crunched over the past several months and the abstract engineering principles simply no longer applied. Their potential impact on this community was clearly evident in the faces before me. With perspiration forming on my brow, I decided I would need to take a new approach to salvage this meeting. So I discarded my rehearsed speech, stepped out from behind the safety of the podium, and began to solicit the council members' questions and concerns. By the end of the afternoon, our efforts to establish a cooperative working relationship had resulted in a distinct shift in...
pages: 3 (words: 718)
comments: 0
added: 12/09/2011
On the first day that I walked into the Church Nursing Home, I was unsure of what to expect. A jumble of questions ran through my mind simultaneously: Is this the right job for me? Will I be capable of aiding the elderly residents? Will I enjoy what I do? A couple of hours later, these questions were largely forgotten as I slowly cut chicken pieces and fed them to Frau Meyer. Soon afterwards, I was strolling through the garden with Herr Schmidt, listening to him tell of his tour of duty in World War II. By the end of the day, I realized how much I enjoyed the whole experience and at the same time smiled at the irony of it all. I needed to travel to Heidelberg, Germany to confirm my interest in clinical medicine. Experiences like my volunteer work in the German nursing home illustrate the decisive role travel has played in my life. For instance, I had volunteered at a local hospital in New York but was not satisfied. Dreams of watching doctors in the ER or obstetricians in the maternity ward were soon replaced with the reality of carrying urine and feces samples to the lab. With virtually no patient contact, my exposure to clinical medicine in this setting was unenlightening and uninspiring. However, in Heidelberg, despite the fact that I frequently change diapers for the incontinent and deal with occasionally cantankerous elderly, I love my twice weekly visits to the nursing home. Here, I feel that I am needed and wanted. That rewarding feeling of fulfillment attracts me to the practice of medicine. My year abroad in Germany also enriched and diversified my experience with research. Although I had a tremendously valuable exposure to research as a summer intern investigating chemotherapeutic resistance in human carcinomas, I...
pages: 3 (words: 619)
comments: 0
added: 11/07/2011
I heard the familiar sound of the back door closing gently. My father was returning from driving his dirty, green John Deere tractor in one of our fields. Although he begins his day at 5:00 a.m. every morning, he usually returns at around 7:00 p.m. I never really questioned his schedule when I was a child, but as I entered high school I wondered how my dad could work so hard every day of the week and still enjoy what he does. He works long hours, becomes filthy from dirt, oil, and mud, and worst of all, can watch all his hard work go to waste if one day of bad weather wipes out our crop. There have been many years when our raisins were rained on, our cherries were hailed on and our apples were literally baked by the sun. The uncertainties of farming are so great and so challenging. It never ceases to amaze me when my father wakes up every morning to start work, that he does so with gusto. The life of a farmer can be laborious and stressful, yet my father continues to do his work with passionate enthusiasm. His dedication and pride mystified me throughout high school. Only after I entered Big U, did I start to understand how he can persevere and face the challenges of farming. I entered Big U like a small child wandering through a park. Never in my life had I been exposed to anything so grandiose and dominating. Born and raised in a rural town of 3000 people, I wasn't ready for the fast-paced life and crowds of Chicago. I eventually grew into its lifestyle and learned to adapt to my new environment. I found my bio-ethics class, in which we discussed major issues in health care, especially interesting....
pages: 3 (words: 747)
comments: 0
added: 12/24/2011
To become a physician is my life’s aspiration. Taking responsibility for people's health and well-being requires first a medical student who is serious about learning, and I am just that. I have good study habits and time management skills, as well as a strong academic background in science. A career in the medical field will give me the unique opportunity to utilize my current and future abilities while benefiting human life and society. One of my most rewarding experiences has been volunteering at the Guild Home for the Aged and Blind. Working with elderly patients at such a young age has opened my eyes to the delicacy of life. I can recall a fellow volunteer conceding defeat when she found the aromas of some patients, as she put it, “intolerable." I, on the other hand, smelled not the age of the body but the decay of life, and held the hands of these patients, some of whom had been forgotten by their families. Henry David Thoreau once said that “The finest qualities of our nature, like the bloom on fruits, can be preserved only by the most delicate handling. Yet we do not treat ourselves nor one another thus tenderly" Primary health-care physicians today need to be both strong and sensitive for their patients, and these are both attributes that I possess. During my study abroad in Cairo, I was exposed to the ailing healthcare system in Egypt, which has further fueled my passion to practice medicine. A program entitled “Doctors Without Borders" was mentioned to me once and since has had growing appeal for me. It is astonishing to learn how in such a system as Egypt’s, only minor regulative adjustments need be made that could possibly save hundreds of thousands of lives. I cannot change the healthcare system, but I...
pages: 3 (words: 574)
comments: 0
added: 11/17/2011
I first became exposed to physical therapy while working at a fitness gym as a personal trainer assisting members reach their health and fitness goals. During the past two summers, I also coached high school girls and boys basketball for my church league. In this position, I accepted the responsibility of being a role model to these children as well as teaching them about physical health. My interest in teaching physical health is parallel with a curiosity of a world where preventive medicine reigns in our society. As I prepare myself academically for the field of physical therapy I often think about the benefits, both individual and collective, of injury rehabilitation. With this in mind, I look forward to being a part of the entire process as a physical therapist. While the science of physical therapy fascinates me, it is the personal connection of the field that draws me toward the profession. I want to help people’s lives by improving their health and their quality of life, as well as having the chance to teach them preventive measures. Teaching patients the importance of the physical therapy is essential to their successful recovery. As an associate in a physical therapy clinic, I learned that educating the patient allowed for them to become more involved in their reconditioning and rehabilitation and thus, speeded up the healing process. The field of physical therapy is what I have been laboring and striving for since I was in high school. I have an enthusiasm for helping others achieve their physical goals and I am motivated and eager to acquire the knowledge necessary in order to exercise this passion. A major part of a physical therapists’ job is treating physical ailments, but equally as important it is about having empathy and care for the actual client. I know...
pages: 2 (words: 325)
comments: 0
added: 12/24/2011
The Anthropology Student Crayfish tails in tarragon butter, galantine of rabbit with foie gras, oxtail in red wine, and apple tartelletes. The patient had this rich meal and complained of "liver upset" (crise de foie). Why a liver ache? I always associate indigestion with a stomach ache. In studying French culture in my Evolutionary Psychology class, I learned that when experiencing discomfort after a rich meal, the French assume their liver is the culprit. Understanding and dealing with the minor — sometimes major — cultural differences is a necessity in our shrinking world and diverse American society. Anthropology has prepared me to effectively communicate with an ethnically diverse population. My science classes, research, and clinical experience have prepared me to meet the demands of medical school. I first became aware of the valuable service that physicians provide when I observed my father, a surgeon, working in his office. I gained practical experience assisting him and his staff perform various procedures in his out-patient center. This exposure increased my admiration for the restorative, technological, and artistic aspects of surgery. I also saw that the application of medical knowledge was most effective when combined with compassion and empathy from the health care provider. While admiring my father's role as a head and neck surgeon helping people after severe accidents, I also found a way to help those suffering from debilitating ailments. Working as a certified physical trainer, I became aware of the powerful recuperative effects of exercise. I was able to apply this knowledge in the case of Sharon, a forty-three-year-old client suffering from lupus. she reported a 200% increase in her strength tests after I trained her. This meant she could once again perform simple tasks like carrying groceries into her house. Unfortunately, this glimpse of improvement was followed by a further deterioration in...
pages: 3 (words: 671)
comments: 0
added: 12/23/2011
The Runner Pounding, rushing footsteps started to close in on me. The roar of the crowd echoed, as I extended my hand to receive the baton that signaled my turn to run. As I tightly wrapped my fingers around it, I felt the wind rush around me, and my tired legs started to carry me faster than I ever dreamed possible. As I rounded the final stretch of track I remember battling fatigue by contemplating two paths: slow down and give up my chance of winning to gain momentary comfort, or push myself even harder and give up momentary comfort to receive greater rewards later. I chose the second path and later held a trophy that represented my perseverance and hard work. The years of running — consistently choosing the second path — have taught me discipline and perseverance. These qualities will help me cross a different finish line and achieve a new goal: becoming a doctor. I have had to learn to budget my time to meet the demands of school, training programs, and volunteer activities. Although I trained and ran at least thirty miles a week throughout college, I also served as a big sister to Kelly, an abused child, and worked in a hospital trauma unit and as a medical assistant in an OB/GYN clinic. My most satisfying volunteer activity, however, was participating in mission work in Mexico City. In Mexico City I continually saw young children whose suffering was overwhelming. These children had never received vaccinations, were lice-infested, and suffered from malnutrition. They also frequently had infections that antibiotics can easily treat, but due to poverty were left untreated. For a week our team worked feverishly to see as many children as possible and treat them to the best of our abilities. I will never forget the feeling of...
pages: 3 (words: 649)
comments: 0
added: 11/09/2011
The AIDS hospice reeked from disease and neglect. On my first day there, after an hour of "training," I met Paul, a tall, emaciated, forty-year-old AIDS victim who was recovering from a stroke that had severely affected his speech. I took him to General Hospital for a long-overdue appointment. It had been weeks since he had been outside. After waiting for two and a half hours, he was called in and then needed to wait another two hours for his prescription. Hungry, I suggested we go and get some lunch. At first Paul resisted; he didn't want to accept the lunch offer. Estranged from his family and seemingly ignored by his friends, he wasn't used to anyone being kind to him — even though I was only talking about a Big Mac. When it arrived, Paul took his first bite. Suddenly, his face lit up with the biggest, most radiant smile. He was on top of the world because somebody bought him a hamburger. Amazing. So little bought so much. While elated that I had literally made Paul's day, the neglect and emotional isolation from which he suffered disgusted me. This was a harsh side of medicine I had not seen before. Right then and there, I wondered, "Do I really want to go into medicine?" What had so upset me about my day with Paul? Before then nothing in my personal, academic, or volunteer experiences had shaken my single-minded commitment to medicine. Why was I so unprepared for what I saw? Was it the proximity of death, knowing Paul was terminal? No it couldn't have been. As a young boy in gutted Beirut I had experienced death time and time again. Was it the financial hardship of the hospice residents, the living from day to day? No, I dealt with...
pages: 4 (words: 1083)
comments: 0
added: 01/05/2012