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Capital Punishment
Death Penalty Death by execution has existed as a punishment since the dawn of time. Yet although this has existed seemingly forever, the question of its morality has also existed for that same amount of time. Killers kill innocent people, there is no question about that, but does that give us the right to kill these killers? I do not think so. Racism is often the driving force behind crime. Yet in a justice system that preaches equality, it too is led by racism. There is "a pattern of evidence indicating racial disparities in the charging, sentencing, and imposition of the death penalty" according to a 1990 U.S. Government report. An overwhelming majority of death row defendants since 1977 were executed for killing whites despite the fact that whites and blacks are victims of murder in approximately equal numbers. In Texas, for example, blacks found guilty of killing whites were found to be six times more likely to receive the death penalty that whites convicted of killing whites. Of the 3,061 inmates on death row 1,246 of them are black, making 40% of death row inmates black. Compare this to the fact that blacks make up 12% of the U.S. population. Furthermore, many black prisoners on death row were sentenced to death by all-white juries after prosecutors had deliberately excluded black people from the jury pool. Racism alone is not the only problem with Capital Punishment. Many inmates on death row suffer from mental retardation. The 1984 ECOSOC safeguards state that the death penalty must not be carried out on persons who have become insane, while the ECOSOC resolution 1989/64 on the execution of the 1984 safeguards recommends that UN member states eliminate the death penalty for persons suffering from mental retardation or extremely limited competence. Amnesty International has documented the cases of...
pages: 4 (words: 916)
comments: 0
added: 12/22/2011
Murder is the unlawful killing of another human being with an intentional or criminal intent. In today's world, terrible crimes are being committed daily. Many believe that these criminals deserve one fate: death. Capital punishment, the death penalty, is the maximum sentence used in punishing people who kill another human being - and is a very controversial method of punishment. In most states, a person convicted of first degree murder has the potential to be given the death penalty. Capital punishment is a subject that can be counted upon to stir emotion and controversy into any conversation or argument. The very concept provokes a profusion of valid questions and opinions. Today's daily world of crime and violence calls for punishment of a severe nature, and many citizens argue that the punishment necessary is the death penalty. These people quote passages such as the "an eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth" concept from the Old Testament of the Judeo-Christian bible. Some people take the neutral position that there is no right or wrong answer, that each opinion on capital punishment is valid in its own way. Opponents of the death penalty claim that sentencing a person to death does not change the reality of the situation; the harm already done simply cannot be fixed from a vengeance standpoint. You cannot bring the murdered person back by taking the prisoner's life. Proponents of capital punishment tend to defend their opinion mainly on two grounds: death is a fitting punishment for murder, and executions maximize public safety through incapacitation and deterrence. The view of proponents of the death penalty in reference to the "let the punishment fit the crime" ideal is that, in the eyes of many law officials and citizens of the United States, if a crime is so serious that it...
pages: 3 (words: 578)
comments: 0
added: 12/27/2011
Definition Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is the execution (killing) of a convicted criminal by the state, as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. Methods There are five methods of execution: Lethal Injection, Electrocution, Lethal Gas, Firing Squad and Hanging. Lethal Injection: When this method is used, the condemned person is usually bound to a gurney and a member of the execution team positions several heart monitors on this skin. Two needles (one is a back-up) are then inserted into usable veins, usually in the inmates arms. Long tubes connect the needle through a hole in a cement block wall to several intravenous drips. The first is a harmless saline solution that is started immediately. Then, at the warden's signal, a curtain is raised exposing the inmate to the witnesses in an adjoining room. Then, the inmate is injected with sodium thiopental - an anesthetic, which puts the inmate to sleep. Next flows pavulon or pancuronium bromide, which paralyzes the entire muscle system and stops the inmate's breathing. Finally, the flow of potassium chloride stops the heart. Death results from anesthetic overdose and respiratory and cardiac arrest while the condemned person is unconscious. Medical ethics preclude doctors from participating in executions. However, a doctor will certify the inmate is dead. This lack of medical participation can be problematic because often injections are performed by inexperienced technicians or orderlies. If a member of the execution team injects the drugs into a muscle instead of a vein, or if the needle becomes clogged, extreme pain can result. Many prisoners have damaged veins resulting from intravenous drug use and it is sometimes difficult to find a usable vein, resulting in long delays while the inmate remains strapped to the gurney. Today, 37 of the 38 states that have the death penalty use...
pages: 19 (words: 5175)
comments: 0
added: 01/23/2012
Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is the toughest form of punishment enforced today in the United States. It is a controversial issue that continues to be debated by the American public. One of the biggest issues being debated is whether or not the death penalty is immoral, excessively cruel or inhumane. I support capital punishment and do not believe that it is cruel or inhumane but that it delivers a small sense of closure to the public. The death penalty is an issue that divides our country. Currently, 65% of Americans support the death penalty for those convicted of murder. This number drops to 50% when a mandatory life in prison sentence is also offered. With an infinite number of variables in cases and in sentencing options, it is easy to see why there are so many different opinions. The National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty (NCADP) is the only fully staffed, national organization committed to removing capital punishment from the nation. Some of the main points that the NCADP brings up are that the death penalty is racially biased, the death penalty cost more to implement than life without parole, the death penalty does not deter capital crime, and that innocent people may be executed. There are also a number of groups that support the death penalty. These groups use the same statistics as the anti-death penalty groups to shine a different light on the same key issues surrounding the death penalty. Racial Bias The NCADP states that "In North Carolina, the odds of receiving a death sentence are 3.5 times higher among defendants whose victims were white," and "The odds of receiving a death sentence in Philadelphia are 38% higher in cases in which the defendant is black." However, pro death penalty groups share these facts, "…found that...
pages: 5 (words: 1252)
comments: 0
added: 02/18/2012
"The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good." - Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) This is a dissertation on the Evolving Standards of Decency in America's judicial system in relation to capital punishment. The first of three arguments in this abstract show how, when, and why America will come to embrace a complete moratorium on capital punishments. Evolving Standards of Decency demonstrates that through the history of America (and the world) people have come to understand, appreciate and the value of human life. Even when considering the lives of convicted criminals justice does not always mean an eye-for-an-eye. State sanctioned executions go back to the reign of King Hammaurabi of Babylon, in the Eighteenth Century B.C. Hammaurabi's Code allowed for the death sentence for twenty-five different crimes. In Fourteenth Century B.C. the Hittite and, the Seventh Century Draconian Code of Athens, made the death penalty law for any crime committed. Also, written on the Twelve Tablets, Fifth Century B.C. Romans decreed that the death sentence could be carried out by such means as impalement, burning, beatings, drowning and notoriously, crucifixion. America however, gets the majority of its ideology about state executions from England. England is home to some of the world's most famous proponents' of the death penalty. Possibly the most notorious was King Henry VIII. During his reign he sought the execution of some twenty-five thousand Englishmen for crimes as menial as hunting on the kings land, delinquent taxes, insanity, witchcraft, hunting of game out of season, adultery, and Judaism. America's first encounter with the death penalty occurred when Captain George Kendall was hung for being a spy for Spain, in Virginia during 1608. Four years later Virginia Governor Sir Thomas Dale enacted the Divine, Moral and Martial Laws which could get you a rope neck...
pages: 4 (words: 1044)
comments: 0
added: 12/22/2011
A man stabs a stranger in the back leaving his victim to suffer a slow, painful death. Should this man be killed for his crime? or should he be locked up in a cell for the rest of his life? I believe capital punishment should not be reintroduced in Britain because, in ending the life of the convicted person, we become murderers, and there is always the risk of killing someone who is later proved innocent. Furthermorethere is no evidence to suggest capital punishment reduces the crime rate any more than a harsh prison sentence. Firstly, if a criminal is convicted and given the death penalty, we are carrying out an act that is as bad as the one we are punishing them for. By stooping to their level we become accomplices to murder. In addition, somebody has to push the button or pull the lever. how would we choose that person? and what effect would it have on their life and the lives of those around them? It is hard to imagine how anyone could live with the fact that they kill people to earn a living. It must also be taken into account, that there have been cases when new evidence has been produced after sentencing, which proves the person has been wrongly convicted. No legal system is totally infallible and the risk of killing an innocent person is not acceptable. Secondly, punishment should have a purpose other than revenge. in civilised society the idea of "An eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth" is outdated. Moreover, as well as punishing the criminal, their sentece should deter others from a life of crime and make society a safer place to live in. In some countries the death sentece is still carried out, such as in some stated of America and...
pages: 3 (words: 653)
comments: 0
added: 08/14/2012
Imagine a loved one was tortured and brutally murdered. Imagine them screaming out for help and no one coming for them. Imagine, their last moments on Earth as the most horrific and terrible anyone has ever known. What should the punishment be for the murderer? After seriously weighing my initial feelings that capital punishment is murder against what I would feel if this happened in my family, I still believe that taking another life is wrong. There is no action that can ever justify the murder of another person. Capital punishment is wrong because the taking of another person's life against their will is murder. Imagine again that a murderer has taken the life of a family member. The first feelings would be intense emotions driven by revenge and retribution. Yet these emotions are what fuel the need for violence. And capital punishment is the most violent response to the crime. This is an emotional response, not a rational one. Violence begets more violence. Statistics show that in the thirty-eight states that have the death penalty, violent crime punishable by the death penalty is not lower then in the states that do not have the death penalty. Nor has it reduced the amount of violent crime in that state. In the world, eighty-six other countries have abolished the death penalty for all crimes. Countries who have not executed a single person in the last ten years are abolitionist-in-practice countries. Twenty-five countries are abolitionist-in-practice. Of the seventy-four countries that retain the death penalty, China, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and the United States account for over 80% of the executions in the world. In the United Kingdom, there is no death penalty, no armed police, and yet, the crime rates are five times lower then they are in the United States. Is this a coincidence?...
pages: 3 (words: 825)
comments: 0
added: 11/19/2011
Capital Punishment Author: Ben DiAnna Date written: 12/11/07 For: Palomar College The use of capital punishment in the U.S. is a growing concern for most American citizens. Controversy of whether to abolish it or not creates moral confusion. On one hand it brings justice, yet on the other its taking a life. According to statistics seventy percent of Americans are in support of the death penalty, while only thirty percent are against it. This clearly shows that a majority of people want to continue using this type of punishment ("Fact" 1). Digging deeper within the debate, one would find that there are two sides to every party's opinion; whether it be religious, governmental, or other. After examining expenditures, morality, deterrent compensations, and retributions, one will likely conclude that the benefits of Capital punishment outweigh the harm. Nearly all civilizations historically have used execution to punish offenders and criminals alike; though customs are different today. Since WWII people routinely try to abolish the death penalty. Today ninety countries have abolished capital punishment for all offences, eleven for all offences except under special circumstances, and thirty-two others have not used it for at least ten years. A total of sixty-four countries still retain it. This includes the People's Republic of China who performed more than 3,400 executions in 2004, amounting to more than 90% of executions worldwide. Within 12 states, the US executed 59 prisoners the same year (Penketh). To abolish the death penalty, people would have to prove points in every aspect of its existence. The economical argument that people must always consider is the cost of the death penalty opposed to life imprisonment. According to California state records, the operating expense to finance the penalty costs tax payers more than $114 million annually (Tempest). A 2005 report from Newsday concluded that New Jersey tax payers have...
pages: 9 (words: 2228)
comments: 0
added: 11/21/2011
Death Penalty Introduction: The most severe of all sentences: that of death. Also known as the death penalty, capital punishment this is the most severe form of corporal punishment as it is requires law enforcement officers to kill the offender. It has been banned in many countries, in the United States, an earlier move to eliminate capital punishment has now been reversed and more and more states are resorting to capital punishment for serious offenses such as murder. An Eye for and eye, a life for a life, who has never heard of the famous lex talionis? The Bible mentions it, and people have been using it regularly for centuries. We use it in reference to burglary, adultery, love and many other situations. However, some people use it on a different level, some people use it in reference to death. One steals from those who have stolen from him, one wrongs those who have wronged him, but do we really have the right to kill those who have killed. Today, there is a big controversy over capital punishment whether or not it works, or if it is morally right. We have a certain privilege on our own lives, but do the lives of others belong to us as well? Do we have the right to decide the kind of lives others can or cannot live? We find someone guilty of murder and sentence him to death, does that not make murderers out of ourselves? Can justice justify our acts? Those who assist in the death penalty are they not partners in crime? Is the death penalty a "Cruel and Unusual" punishment or is it now a necessary tool in the war on crime? With the increase in crime and violence in our society, how does the death penalty affect a North American...
pages: 8 (words: 2181)
comments: 0
added: 12/14/2011
Capital Punishment has been one of the most controversial topics in the past decade, and for that I will only be addressing certain aspects of the argument, due to its broadness. What is cruel and unusual punishment? Is having a man shot in the head or hung by a rope until he dies cruel and unusual? Also, why is it that the unknowing American tax payer has to blow there hard earned money on non human like criminals who feel no remorse for what they have done. The answer is elementary, Capital Punishment is unconstitutional and not cost effective. According to the 8th Amendment of the Constitution, the people of the United States shall in no way receive any cruel or unusual punishment. That being the case, then what is cruel and unusual punishment? It is safe to say that Capital Punishment is highly unused and therefore unusual punishment. According to the Death Penalty Information Center nearly a fourth of the United States does not have an acting death penalty and of those that do nine have executed 3 or less inmates since 1976. Knowing these facts you can only conclude that the death penalty is highly unused and therefor is unusual punishment. Cruelty is even a more obvious when you examine the current methods of capital punishment. Electrocution, hanging, and a firing squad all of which are barbaric in origin to begin with. As stated by one of the Florida State Supreme Court Justices "execution by electrocution is a spectacle whose time has passed... Florida's electric chair, by it's own track record, has proven itself to be a dinosaur more benefiting the laboratory of the Baron Frankenstein than the death chamber of Florida State Prison" (the Death Penalty Information Center). The Webster's Dictionary defines justice as a "principle of moral or...
pages: 3 (words: 820)
comments: 0
added: 01/29/2012
Twenty-six years ago, on July 2, 1976, the U.S. Supreme Court voted 7-2 in Gregg v. Georgia to reinstate the death penalty after a brief official break. Implicit in the Gregg decision was the optimistic belief that the many problems identified by a previous Supreme Court decision, Furman v. Georgia, could be fixed. In 1972, the Furman Court had struck down hundreds of state laws that the justices deemed illogical. But the majority in Gregg argued that objective standards would minimize impulsive decisions of the jurors and reduce discrimination. A quarter-century and more than 700 executions later, the promise of Gregg seems ridiculously naive. Gregg's ambition was to rationalize sentencing and ensure that death sentences would be applied more equitably and only to the most appalling offenders. It hasn't worked out that way. Today in the United States, more than 3,700 men and women await execution on death row. The overwhelming number of those put to death will be poor, members of a minority, uneducated, or of questionable sanity, and they will have been represented by some of the worst lawyers available. Clearly, it was absurd to assume that the state legislatures that had crafted the unconstitutional laws criticized by the Furman decision would suddenly fix them. The death penalty should be abolished if it can not be administered fairly and impartially. Obvious racial discrimination in the administration of the death penalty remains routine. Nearly 90 percent of the federal inmates on death row are minorities. Also, more than 76 percent of the cases, in which federal prosecutors had sought the death penalty during the previous five years, involved a defendant who belonged to a minority group. In the same study, U.S. attorneys were nearly twice as likely to recommend death for an African-American defendant than a Caucasian defendant (Clay 118-122). Under the...
pages: 4 (words: 963)
comments: 0
added: 01/19/2012
Over the past many years, people have argued over the effectiveness of the death penalty. The majority of executions have come from convictions of homicides (murder), though execution has been a choice in punishment for rape, treason, kidnapping, and armed robbery. Many people consider the death penalty as immoral and ineffective to deter crime. These people are half right; it is an ineffective means to deter crime. With this understood, it is time that we need to make a reform in the death penalty to make criminals, or future criminals, stop from murdering, raping, kidnapping, or robbing. Back in Ancient Rome, under the reign of Justinian I, around 533 AD, many crimes fit the description for the death penalty. These reasons included, but were not limited to, rape, treason, embezzlement, forgery, and kidnapping. Murder, however, was punished by banishment, a worse punishment than death itself in those days. In England during the Middle Ages, any serious crime, listed as arson, burglary, counterfeiting, murder, rape, and treason, was punishable by the death penalty. Currently, the death penalty is used mainly in cases of treason and murder. Most of the other listed offenses are punished with lengthy jail terms. Through these ages, technology has helped advance the uses of the death penalty. In the days before Justinian I, most criminals were put into the Coliseum and made to fight either trained gladiators or half-starved lions. Later, after many centuries, executions became a popular public affair. Customs of those days were to pay the executioner some money for a clean swipe; using an axe was not very accurate, and most executioners took two or three hacks before cutting through the neck, as most executions were beheadings. Hanging, of course, was still an option, but if the rope did not snap your neck, then you would...
pages: 4 (words: 957)
comments: 0
added: 02/18/2012
Each year there are about 250 people added to the death row and 35 executed. The death penalty is one of the harshest forms of punishment enforced in the United States today. Once a jury has convicted a criminal, of an offense they go to the second part of the trail, the punishment phase. If the jury recommends the death penalty and the judge agrees then the criminal will face some form of execution. Lethal injection is the most common form of execution used today. There was a period from 1972 to 1976 that capital punishment was ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. Their reason for this decision was that the death penalty was cruel and unusual punishment under the eighth amendment. The decision was reversed when new methods of execution were introduced. I am opposed to capital punishment because I don't think that it is right to execute someone for making one or two wrong decisions. Capital Punishment is a cruel and unusual punishment. There also is a possibility of innocent death and it doesn't deter crime. The strongest argument against capital punishment is the argument capital punishment is a cruel and unusual punishment. The Eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution, condemning cruel and unusual punishment, is used to protest Capital Punishment. The fallacy of this argument is that it appears to be a red herring augment, one that takes attention away from the facts of the case. When the Constitution was drafted, capital punishment was practiced widely in this country, yet it was not specified as wrong. Many of the framers of the constitution endorsed capital punishment, as did the philosophers that which the constitution draws from. John Lock went to say that murder is not wrong. So how can murder be immoral? Citizens under social contract agree not to...
pages: 3 (words: 738)
comments: 0
added: 01/06/2012
The death penalty has become archaic. As a society, we have become more civilized. The death penalty is only carried out in an erratic fashion. It has not been shown to be a deterrent to murder. As our society evolves in science, health and social awareness, it is only right that we should reject the death penalty as the cruel, barbaric, and outmoded vehicle it has become. We, as a society, are becoming more civilized. But we are currently the only nation in the western democratic world that has not abolished capital punishment. According to Amnesty International USA, we are the only country in the western world, since 1977, to execute inmates, who were under 18 years old, when they committed their crime. The United States has not actually executed any child, under the age of 18, because these inmates are actually in their twenties or thirties before all of their appeals have been heard. So we are actually executing them for something they did as a teen, even though the actual execution takes place years later. As awful as this sounds, there are countries in this world who execute teenagers. Yemen executed a thirteen-year-old child, who was found guilty of robber and murder. The former governor of California, Pete Wilson, has suggested that fourteen-year-olds should be eligible for the death penalty. He said that gangs use younger members to kill because they know that they will not be given the death penalty if caught. He believes that this would be a deterrent. Luckily this has not become a law in California, or the rest of the country. Pope John Paul II has criticized the United States for embracing the culture of death. Vatican II came out against the death penalty. The council stated that the death penalty may be the "only possible way...
pages: 5 (words: 1101)
comments: 0
added: 04/04/2012
Capital Punishment - Against Looking out for the state of the public's satisfaction in the scheme of capital sentencing does not constitute serving justice. Today's system of capital punishment is filled with inequalities and injustices. The commonly offered arguments for the death penalty are filled with holes. "It was a deterrent. It removed killers. It was the ultimate punishment. It is biblical. It satisfied the public's need for retribution. It relieved the anguish of the victim's family."(Grisham 120) Realistically, imposing the death penalty is expensive and time consuming. Retroactively, it has yet to be proven as a deterrent. Morally, it is a continuation of the cycle of violence and "...degrades all who are involved in its enforcement, as well as its victim."(Stewart 1) Perhaps the most frequent argument for capital punishment is that of deterrence. The prevailing thought is that imposition of the death penalty will act to dissuade other criminals from committing violent acts. Numerous studies have been created attempting to prove this belief; however, "all the evidence taken together makes it hard to be confident that capital punishment deters more than long prison terms do."(Cavanagh 4) The more we resort to killing as a legitimate response to our frustration and anger with violence, the more violent our society becomes. "We could execute all three thousand people on death row, and most people would not feel any safer tomorrow."(Frame 51) In addition, with the growing humanitarianism of modern society, the number of inmates actually put to death is substantially lower than 50 years ago. This decline creates a situation in which the death penalty ceases to be a deterrent when the populace begins to think that one can get away with a crime and go unpunished. The key part of the death penalty is that it involves death-something which is rather...
pages: 5 (words: 1178)
comments: 0
added: 01/03/2012
The death penalty is the consequence that one human being must face for murdering another human being. The issue of the death penalty has long been debated. Some people believe it is the necessary sentence used for stopping crime. Others believe that it has no effect on crime. With the implementation of the death penalty, a lesser amount of crimes will be committed. Today such executions as electrocution, the gas chamber, and lethal injection are the main punishments for the crimes. All of these are contributing factors as deterrents of crime. Violence dominates the very streets that we walk in. Now more than ever, our society does not have normalcy. The world is not getting any safer. In order to ensure somewhat of a safe world, the death penalty must be enforced. In doing so, we will force the people who commit crimes to think twice about their actions. They must know that they will suffer the most extreme of consequences for their actions Americans value the death penalty, not only for its utility as a crime reduction tool, but also as a way of doing justice. Some crimes that occur are so vicious that they cause an abundance of outrage amongst people everywhere. For crimes such as these, society believes that it is necessary to express its outrage by seeking retribution, by punishing the offender in the most severe way possible. The only way they see it by killing him or her. If life is the most precious thing, then why is it that there are murderers that are still breathing the very air that the person that they killed once breathed. The death penalty also deters potential murderers from committing criminal acts. By having the death penalty, the message that severe crimes are unacceptable and that it is punishable...
pages: 3 (words: 603)
comments: 0
added: 01/20/2012
Society approves the death penalty by dehumanization through the objectification of the people on death row. This dehumanization allows for society to step back and objectify the people, thereby 'giving the thumbs up' to execute them...approving it. Thus, calling it as a tool of justice or rather calls it 'justice is served'. However, the victims and society knowingly acknowledges the illogical fallacy of capital punishment: the person severing on death row killed another person to end up there, but they are to receive the same action they committed by the state and call it justice. To understand notion of this thought of dehumanization resulting in the approval of the death penalty, one must understand the history of the death penalty, what is it in society, their company, how society influences the individual to approve the death penalty and its actual execution, how dehumanization is dangerous to use to justify goals, and finally the illogical fallacy to capital punishment. During colonial times of America, the Europeans brought with them their notions of justice with them including the idea of capital punishment. However, many more crimes were punishable in Early America such as in New York, hitting one's parent was punishable by death. People recognize the nature of capital punishment and as a result wanted reforms to take place. In 1794, the state of Pennsylvania stopped imposing the death penalty for all offenses except first degree murder. This was the first of reforms that resulted in today's modern death penalty. In modern times, one is able to gain the death punishment through first degree murder, treason, and espionage. The federal court is able to execute someone if that person so happens to commit a federal crime such as treason. Other then federal crimes, the state have the power to execute a person. Also...
pages: 6 (words: 1413)
comments: 0
added: 01/28/2012
"The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good." - Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) This is a dissertation on the Evolving Standards of Decency in America's judicial system in relation to capital punishment. The first of three arguments in this abstract show how, when, and why America will come to embrace a complete moratorium on capital punishments. Evolving Standards of Decency demonstrates that through the history of America (and the world) people have come to understand, appreciate and the value of human life. Even when considering the lives of convicted criminals justice does not always mean an eye-for-an-eye. State sanctioned executions go back to the reign of King Hammaurabi of Babylon, in the Eighteenth Century B.C. Hammaurabi's Code allowed for the death sentence for twenty-five different crimes. In Fourteenth Century B.C. the Hittite and, the Seventh Century Draconian Code of Athens, made the death penalty law for any crime committed. Also, written on the Twelve Tablets, Fifth Century B.C. Romans decreed that the death sentence could be carried out by such means as impalement, burning, beatings, drowning and notoriously, crucifixion. America however, gets the majority of its ideology about state executions from England. England is home to some of the world's most famous proponents' of the death penalty. Possibly the most notorious was King Henry VIII. During his reign he sought the execution of some twenty-five thousand Englishmen for crimes as menial as hunting on the kings land, delinquent taxes, insanity, witchcraft, hunting of game out of season, adultery, and Judaism. America's first encounter with the death penalty occurred when Captain George Kendall was hung for being a spy for Spain, in Virginia during 1608. Four years later Virginia Governor Sir Thomas Dale enacted the Divine, Moral and Martial Laws which could get you a rope neck...
pages: 4 (words: 1044)
comments: 0
added: 11/26/2011
When turning on the television, radio, or simply opening the local newspaper, one is bombarded with news of arrests, murders, homicides, serial killers, and other such tragedies. It is a rare occasion to go throughout a day in this world and not hear of these things. So what should be done about this crime rate? Not only is it committing a crime, but today, it is signing your life over to the government. This is a risk one is taking when he decides to pull a trigger or plunge a knife, but is it really up to our justice system to decide one's fate? There are many issues that address this question of capital punishment such as religion, the effect on society, restitution being denied, the possible "wrongly accused", and the rights of the convicted. But how often do these concepts creep into the public's mind when it hears of our 'fair, trusty' government taking away someone's breathing rights? The Bible states "Thou shalt not kill," and this being a sin should have to be amended within oneself. However, the Bible also states "Don't judge others' personal convictions." It is the government's responsibility to punish people that disobey the law to keep our world in tact but is it their right to take away their lives? It is a Christian's responsibility to point out to those who sin that they do so and this country, trusting in God as it says it does, should do just that. So if the government stands strongly by this statement that's on the dollar bill, may they line up all the liars, adulterers, Buddhists, thieves, covetous and murderers at the chair. If they shall look into this one sin as so evil may they see all ten commandments so holy. The society is so confused as...
pages: 3 (words: 815)
comments: 0
added: 01/23/2012
The death penalty ultimate goal is to stop crime. What is the difference in the state killing someone and a man killing another man? Either way someone is being murdered and murder is a crime. People think that if you execute a person that you are freeing up more tax dollars for the state. Then you have the issue of dealing with people's moral and religious beliefs. When a person is given the death penalty, you are in essence giving them the easy way out of the situation. The death penalty has failed totally because it was a seriously flawed and unnecessary law. The death penalty should have never been considered, much less implemented and I feel that it should be abolished. The key part of the death penalty is that it involves death, something, which is rather permanent for humans. This creates a major problem when "there continue to be many instances of innocent people being sentence to death."(Hanks 142) In our legal system, there exist lots of ways in which justices might be poorly served for a recipient of the death sentence. One way is the handling of ones own defense counsel. If a defendant is without counsel, a lawyer will provide. But a lot of the attorney's given to defendant lack the qualities necessary to provide competent defense. With payment caps or court-determined sums of, for example $5 an hour, there is not much incentive for a lawyer to spend a great deal of time representing defendants. When you compare this to prosecution, "aided by police, other law enforcement agencies, crime labs, state mental hospitals, various other scientific resources, experienced prosecutors in these type cases, and grand juries"(Hank 144), the defense that the court provide is little no help. What if a defendant has a valid case to...
pages: 4 (words: 942)
comments: 0
added: 01/06/2012