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Immigration
Hmong Means Free uses the unedited life stories of several Hmong refugees from different age groups as told by themselves to offer an unbiased look at the struggles of Laotian immigrants. The inclusion of the entire life story serves to put their immigration into context, describing the immigration as a necessity rather than a choice. The introduction characterized the Hmong as a peaceful people who were inadvertently caught in a war that they were neither responsible for, nor interested in. The book's use of personal accounts also provides a look at the diverse backgrounds of Laotian immigrants and the accounts of Hmong life in both Laos and America has a humanizing effect on the perception of Asian immigrants in general. It successfully allowed Laotian refugees to present their perspective and feelings on their immigration and goals in America, refuting the stereotypical views of leeching and inhuman refugees held by many in America at the time of their arrival. It is interesting that most of the challenges faced by the Laotian immigrants in America were very similar to those challenges described by Nazli Kibria in Family Tightrope. For example, both texts suggest that learning English and becoming familiar with American customs allows Asian immigrant children to assimilate easier into American culture and feel more accepted. Ironically, however, even though education is highly valued by Asian immigrants, the educational system serves to contradict much of parental teachings and erodes the Asian identity they wish to maintain. As Xang Mao Xiong says "The children of today have no respect for their elders and do not fear their parents. Americans do not understand our culture, and we do not understand theirs (101)." These similarities suggest that any immigrant is likely to face the same type of problems in America – racism, language-barriers, difficulty in cultural...
pages: 2 (words: 469)
comments: 0
added: 10/31/2011
One of the most controversial political issues of today is that of illegal immigrants from Mexico. Illegal immigration into the United States is a problem that should be stopped, as it is unfair to both Americans and to the people of the country from which they illegally immigrated. It is thought that the majority of illegal aliens residing in the U.S. are Mexicans (Anderson 55). Roy Beck clarifies the situation by stating, "The national consensus is that the United States should be a post-mass immigration country has included most leaders of business, religion, labor, academia, and social work." Illegal immigration from Mexico must be stopped by means of different policies and other methods of prevention, because the effects on both Mexico and the United States are predominately unfavorable. There are multiple policies and means of preventing illegal immigrants from entering the United States. Immigration laws are the catalysts of illegal immigration prevention. Proposition 187 is a tough immigration law clamping down on illegal aliens, used in California, the state with the most illegal immigrants. It doubled the number of boarder guards, made it harder for legal immigrants to bring their families over, not permitting as much political asylum and was harder on illegal aliens already here (DiConsiglio 3). NAFTA, officially, hasn't reduced as much illegal immigration as had been hoped, but, it helped Mexico recover faster from it's economic crisis in '94-'95, which has stopped a larger flood of people, since most immigrants tend to come to the U.S. in times of Mexican economic depression ("Mexico" 2). The major reason Mexicans tend to illegally immigrate is to find jobs. Therefore, elimination of the chance of them getting a job would be a deterrent. A bill shown to the House, by California would let the employer enter a job applicant's social security...
pages: 4 (words: 1094)
comments: 0
added: 09/21/2011
Illegal Immigration One of the most controversial political issues of today is that of illegal immigrants from Mexico. Illegal immigration into the United States is a problem that should be stopped, as it is unfair to both Americans and to the people of the country from which they illegally immigrated. It is thought that the majority of illegal aliens residing in the U.S. are Mexicans (Anderson 55). Roy Beck clarifies the situation by stating, "The national consensus is that the United States should be a post-mass immigration country has included most leaders of business, religion, labor, academia, and social work." Illegal immigration from Mexico must be stopped by means of different policies and other methods of prevention, because the effects on both Mexico and the United States are predominately unfavorable. There are multiple policies and means of preventing illegal immigrants from entering the United States. Immigration laws are the catalysts of illegal immigration prevention. Proposition 187 is a tough immigration law clamping down on illegal aliens, used in California, the state with the most illegal immigrants. It doubled the number of boarder guards, made it harder for legal immigrants to bring their families over, not permitting as much political asylum and was harder on illegal aliens already here (DiConsiglio 3). NAFTA, officially, hasn't reduced as much illegal immigration as had been hoped, but, it helped Mexico recover faster from it's economic crisis in '94-'95, which has stopped a larger flood of people, since most immigrants tend to come to the U.S. in times of Mexican economic depression ("Mexico" 2). The major reason Mexicans tend to illegally immigrate is to find jobs. Therefore, elimination of the chance of them getting a job would be a deterrent. A bill shown to the House, by California would let the employer enter a job applicant's social...
pages: 4 (words: 1096)
comments: 0
added: 10/12/2011
In today's society, there are many different terms and definitions used to describe multiculturalism. For example, "melting pot", "mosaic", and "assimilation" are the most commonly used terms today to describe multiculturalism. However, with societies different definitions of multiculturalism there will always be stereotyping, bias opinions, racism as well as problems associated with cultural references. Nevertheless, by raising awareness of the multicultural policy in future generations one could only hope to eliminate such behaviours. One of the ways multiculturalism had been defined is by the term "melting pot". Melting pot is when a culture, say for example Japanese, moves to the United States of America, the Japanese would then take on an American culture, which then becomes the majority culture. Gloria Yamato sates that we must reclaim whatever parts of our ethnic heritage that we have lost. She feels that this so called "melting pot" has succeeded into turning us into "fast gobbling generics". In the story, "For Mataji" by Amita Handa the author says that girls couldn't go to school because they weren't looked at in the same way that the boys were (280, Amita Handa). Not allowing girls to go to school is prejudice, because of the fact that they're equal, and are not different. However, in the Proclamation of the Canadian Constitution, Pierre Elliot Trudeau stated "I speak of a country where every person is free to fulfill himself or herself to the utmost, unhindered by the arbitrary actions of governments" (430, Pierre Elliot Trudeau). This means that he believes everyone is enjoy themselves to the fullest and not to hold back anything about themselves. The second way multiculturalism had been defined is by the term "mosaic". Mosaic is when there are many cultures in one place but all of the different cultures can practice their own beliefs without being...
pages: 3 (words: 774)
comments: 0
added: 10/07/2011
Immigration should be restricted in the United States in almost every form. The government is in enough chaos trying to handle merely the Americans there are now, without having to deal with the influx of thousands of aliens each year. Along with the myriad of immigrants to the U.S. comes an equal number of problems. The U.S. has some of the most lenient laws governing immigration in the world, and as a result our government supports thousands more than it should have to. People cross our borders to leech off welfare and unemployment checks that actual citizens need to function in society. Schools are forced to teach lessons multi-lingual to accommodate those children who aren't even supposed to be here. Just imagine having to take twice as long to teach something because it must be repeated in many languages... we'd all be learning how to add in fourth grade. The sign in New York reads "give us your poor, your tired, your huddled masses," but why would we want them? It is not our burden to baby-sit the world. There's no reason that we should have to clothe, feed, and shelter every-one that feels oppressed in his or her country, because if we do, we'll end up as crowded as China. Our ancestors had to work to make this country what it is today by offering their sweat and blood to the causes. We are great now because they died and suffered; the foreigners want to come in to reap the benefits without having to pay the price. By allowing people into our country we decrease the quality of life for all of those who offered their lives and their sons' lives for freedom, and in a law-abiding country that is simply not principled or just....
pages: 2 (words: 296)
comments: 0
added: 12/18/2011