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Alexander Graham Bell's invention of the telephone grew out of his research into ways to improve the telegraph. His soul purpose was to help the deaf hear again. Alexander Graham Bell was not trying to invent the telephone, he was just trying to help out people in need. Young Alexander Graham Bell, Aleck as his family knew him, took to reading and writing at a precociously young age. Bell family lore told of his insistence upon mailing a letter to a family friend well before he had grasped any understanding of the alphabet. As he matured, Aleck displayed what came to be known as a Bell family trademark--an expressive, flexible, and resonant speaking voice. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, the inventor spent one year at a private school, two years at Edinburgh's Royal High School (from which he graduated at 14), and attended a few lectures at Edinburgh University and at University College in London, but he was largely family-trained and self-taught. He moved to the United States, settling in Boston, before beginning his career as an inventor. With each passing year, Alexander Graham Bell's intellectual horizons broadened. By the time he was 16, he was teaching music and elocution at a boy's boarding school. He and his brothers, Melville and Edward, traveled throughout Scotland impressing audiences with demonstrations of their father's Visible Speech techniques. Visible Speech was invented by their father but he didn't have much luck with it. It is a technique were ever sound that comes out of a persons mouth can be represented with a visual character. In 1871, Bell began giving instruction in Visible Speech at the Boston School for Deaf Mutes. Attempting to teach deaf children to speak was considered revolutionary. Bell's work with his deaf students in Boston would prove to be a watershed event in his...
pages: 4 (words: 905)
comments: 1
added: 12/19/2011
Reference Material Alexander Graham Bell was born in 1847. As a child He took after his grandfather who was an actor who entertained people with his voice. Alexanders mother, who was deaf, would have people talk to her through her ear tube, which amplifies speech by talking through a object that looked like a horn. Alexander choose to talk to his mother by speaking in low tones very close to her forehead. Alexander thought that his mother would be able to "hear" him by the vibrations his voice put on her forehead. Alexander at about the age of 14 and his brother, Melville, created a contraption that had a fake mouth, tongue, and lungs that you could force air out of. This contraption could make human-like sounds. After this Alexander manipulated his dogs vocal cords and mouth to change growls to words. By the time Alexander was sixteen he was teaching music at a boys boarding school.The invention of the telephone was a great success. It took the world by a storm. It took a lot of work and Tammy Fairchild helped out but no one gave her the credit. Even though Alexander Graham Bell had the idea to make the telephone. Some of her idea's was put into making the telephone.The invention of the telephone was a great success. It took the world by a storm. It took a lot of work and Tammy Fairchild helped out but no one gave her the credit. Even though Alexander Graham Bell had the idea to make the telephone. Some of her idea's was put into making the telephone. Alexander Graham Bell was born on March 3, 1847 in Edinbuigh, Scotland. He spent a year in private school and then he went to Edinburgh's Royal High, which he graduated at the age of fourteen....
pages: 2 (words: 439)
comments: 2
added: 11/22/2011
Alexander Graham Bell is a name of great significance in American history today. A skillful inventor and generous philanthropist, he astounded the world with his intuitive ideas that proved to be both innovative and extremely practical in the latter half of the 19th century. Most notable, of course, are Bell's work in developing the telephone and his venerable life-long endeavor to educate the deaf. Originally, his only wish was to help deaf people overcome their difficulty in learning verbal communication, and later was pushed into researching the possibility of a device that could transmit the human voice electronically over a distance. After building his first working telephone model, Bell's fame spread quickly as people in America and around the world began to realize the awesome potential this wonderfully fascinating new device held in store for society (Brinkley 481). His telephone an instant success and already a burgeoning industry, A. G. Bell decided to turn his attention back to assisting the deaf and following other creative ideas including the development of a metal detector, an electric probe which was used by many surgeons before the X ray was invented, a device having the same purpose as today's iron lung, and also a method of locating icebergs by detecting echoes from them. With his many inventions (especially the insanely popular and universally applied telephone), his efforts to educate the deaf, and the founding and financing of the American Association to Promote the Teaching of Speech to the Deaf (now called the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf), Alexander Graham Bell has become a very important historical figure indeed (Berstein 9). Perhaps a key factor in Bell's successful life was his invigorating background. His family and his education definitely had a deep influence on his career. Born in Scotland, his mother was a painter and an accomplished musician, his father a teacher of the deaf and speech textbook writer. His father invented "Visible Speech," a code of symbols which indicated the...
pages: 3 (words: 808)
comments: 1
added: 08/01/2011
On May 12 1812 Edward Lear was born in Highgate London. Edward was the twentieth child of Jeremiah Lear, a London stockbroker, and his wife Ann. Four years after his birth, Jeremiah lost most of the family's earnings and riches in the Stock Exchange, therefore forcing them to leave the fashionable life to which they grew accustomed too. From there, Edwards's mother rejected him, and his upbringing was in the hands of his oldest sister Ann. Young Edward certainly resented his mother's rejection, but found all the love he needed in Ann. Edward suffered from attacks of what he called "The Demon", epilepsy as well as asthma, bronchitis and poor eyesight. When he was five or six, sudden mood swings as well as depression started to begin. Other than Edwards's school education, his sister constantly read classical tales and modern poetry to him as well as taught him to draw. By the age of fifteen Lear's father retired and could not provide for his children, Edward, who was still living with Ann, was forced to get a job. He made money from drawing and painting as well as teaching drawing and selling sketches. Edward also worked as a draughtsman for the Zoological Society when he illustrated a book about parrots. Edward created a name for himself as an "Ornithological Draughtsman" and is also nominated as an "Associate of the Linen Society." In 1832, Earl of Derby commissioned him to create a collection of drawings of rare birds. This allowed Edward to travel widely in Italy, Greece, Germany, Belgium and Switzerland, creating collections of oil paintings and drawings which he later published in travel books known as, "Sketches of Rome" (1842) and "Illustrated Excursion in Italy" (1846). In 1835 Edward traveled to Ireland with Edward Stanley (Bishop of Norwich) and his son Arthur Stanley....
pages: 3 (words: 816)
comments: 2
added: 12/01/2011
July 5, 2003 POEM ANALYSIS:On "The Road Not Taken" American poet, Robert Frost, published On "The Road Not Taken," in 1915. This is the poem I have chosen to analyze for this class, written when the poet was approximately 40 years old. Frost was influenced by the way of the times. Historically, world unrest was prevalent in 1915. For the first time ever, many countries around the world were at war. World War I has just begun, fueled when Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. In the U.S., civil rights for blacks continued to grow. During that year, 10,000 blacks march in New York City protesting lynching. The industrial revolution was growing by leaps and bounds; the Ford Motor Company manufactures its one millionth T automobile. And, Alexander Graham Bell in New York calls Thomas Watson in San Francisco in 1915. Frost, in this lyrical poem introduces the central theme, the dilemma man faces when forced to make a difficult choice and the related consequences of the action. Symbolically, man's choices are reflected in the poem's reference to a fork in the road. In addition, it raises the question of whether it is better to choose a road in which many travel, or to choose the road less traveled and explore on your own. In "The Road Not Taken," the speakers' tone and setting help illustrate the struggle a person goes through in their lives to pick the right road to travel. Frost, when he wrote his poem, appears to struggle with a major decision. While the world was uneasy, it sounds as if his personal world was also in unrest. In addition, Frost, at about 40 years old was approaching his mid-life – a time for many, especially men, to contemplate life, decision, choices made and the future. It is told in first person, a...
pages: 4 (words: 854)
comments: 0
added: 12/16/2011
Can you imagine what it would be like if you couldn't tell the one's you care about that you love them? Language is such an important part of our everyday lives. To these four courageous writer's language meant so much more, and was a way for them to express who they really were. There is Amy Tan who loved English so much that she was ashamed of her mother. The truly inspirational Helen Keller, overcame being deaf and blind. To be one of the most influential writers of our time There is Fredrick Douglass who had to overcome being a slave in order to become an important piece of our history. Then there is Chang-rae Lee a man with such a unique way with words. Language played a major role in the lives of Helen Keller, Fredrick Douglass, Amy Tan, and Chang-rae Lee. First is Amy Tan who was born in California in 1952( WP 271). Her parents immigrated from China to give Amy a chance at a good life here in the states. At the age of eight Tan "won a writing contest that would in turn ignite her passion for writing" (Tan 271). Tan loved English at an early age and picked it up rather well. Tan was one of the smartest students in her class and excelled pretty quickly in her studies. Tan said later as an adult that: " language helped shape the way she saw things, expressed things, made sense of things" (Tan 273). Tan's mother was not educated, and knew very little English. Tan's mother's English was often called broken because hardly anyone could understand what she was trying to say. People in department stores, at banks, and at restaurants didn't take her seriously because they didn't know what she was saying. Some ignorant people...
pages: 8 (words: 1968)
comments: 1
added: 12/07/2011
"Like it or not (and much of the world often has not), for the moment, the West has triumphed." What exactly does this quote mean? What does 'for the moment" mean? What is 'triumphed'? Who exactly is 'the West'? To begin with the West begins in Europe, specifically Western Europe. When colonization begins, in the late 1400's to 1500's the West becomes America too. Before this there was not really a modern civilization. As Europe spread, so did the West. Now what does 'for the moment mean'? It means that the West will not triumph forever. There was a time, believe it or not, when the Chinese were the 'triumphing' country or civilization. In a few hundred years there is a good chance that the West will no longer be the triumphing civilization. What is 'triumph'? Triumphing can be anything from winning wars, inventing machines that make the world better, having a good economy, or even just having your people happy. All of this the West has done at one point or another. This quote is saying that the West is essentially in control of the world. Yes, we like this but the rest of the world doesn't. lkjadflgkjdf In 431 BCE Pericles made an oration (a speech) to the people of Athens. It was praising their system of government. This outlined what Athenian democracy was like, and we have used many of their ideas in our own democracy. Athens, Greece had the first step in Western culture of creating democracy; a government in which the people vote for who they want in office, or to lead them. Athens' version of democracy was not the same as ours. They didn't vote for people to represent them, they voted directly for the issues that affected their society. This type of democracy is...
pages: 7 (words: 1821)
comments: 0
added: 02/04/2012
For thousands of years, people have emigrated from one country to another. People move for many reasons. They may be seeking new opportunities for jobs, or they may be trying to escape from religious or political persecution. They may be living in unacceptable living conditions and/or wish to move away from a government they do not like. Most all people who relocate are seeking greater freedom. Many years of people entering a region can quickly change a country's population. The large increase in population causes problems for the country to which a person moves. Whether immigration is a contribution to society or a negative impact on the government it is up to the immigrant to decide, even though it is Congress who passes the laws concerning them. Immigration may have its advantages, but it is the disadvantages that have a greater impact on society. There are a wide range of harmful effects that immigration has on society, including the loss of jobs for the American citizens, the transfer of new diseases, and the overcrowding of areas that cannot be expanded. Congress has tried to limit these problems by passing laws that state the condition that a person must be in to enter the country. Unfortunately, this has not stopped people from entering. In many cases, people wishing to enter the country do so unlawfully by sneaking across borders to enter without being stopped. These people are called illegal immigrants and they create a threat to society. The threats can go as far as the transferring of new diseases to people. Many of the immigrants have not received treatment for the disease and have not been vaccinated at all. The threat of drug dealers, mostly along the Mexican border, and mentally ill people are also growing problems. Many immigrants, both legal and illegal, are...
pages: 3 (words: 649)
comments: 0
added: 12/19/2011
The industrial Revolution was one of the most significant epochs in human history. It indicated the change from an agrarian, handicraft economy to one dominated by industry, machines, and manufacturing. The industrial Revolution has showed the way to such important changes in the way goods were produced and in the way people lived that it completely altered the world. This drastic change benefited life but hindered it as well. Pollution at a scale the world had never seen before augmented tainting the air, water, ground, and the environment. Working conditions declined considerably and wages decreased, and the number of women and children working amplified tearing apart family ties and religious and moral values. However, the industrial Revolution had other more benign results as well. They include advances in technology, communication, the development of new inventions such as the internal-combustion engine, advances is science, medicine, increase in mobility of the population, and interest in the social sciences, education, and changes in music, literature, and the arts. . The industrial Revolution was largely illustrated through technological strides which was seen through developments in electricity and the application of the internal-combustion engines to daily lives. The power of electricity was exploited to upgrade technology and social and home life. In 1831 an English scientist, Michael Faraday, drawing from the works of Ampere and other scientists, figured out that magnetism could produce electricity. This concept and principle is still in use today via the dynamo, a device that transformed mechanical energy into electrical energy. Thomas Edison, an American inventor, formulated an electric bulb that glowed for lengthy amounts of time before burning out. Realizing the importance of a steady flow of electric current to their destinations, Edison worked out a central powerhouse and transmission system. People also discovered means to tap waterfalls and rivers to...
pages: 13 (words: 3534)
comments: 1
added: 11/22/2011
The well known telephone is one of the biggest inventions that have impacted our daily lives. As well, many innovations have been created because of the telephone that are included in our everyday lifestyles. The telephone was invented by Alexander Graham Bell on March, 10 1876. Bell was 29 years old and he had been trying to create the telephone from 1872 – 1876. Finally, he found the perfect idea and the success with the telephone came from a direct attempt to improve the telegraph. The telephone was described as being able to "talk with electricity". In 1877, construction of the first telephone line was from Boston to Somerville, Massachusetts. By the end of 1880, there were 47,900 telephones in the United States. The telephone has been apart of everyone's daily lives and to imagine our lives without the telephone would be so boring. People use phones to do business, talk to family and friends far away or near to them, to get advice or just to chat and to get help. People would be so lonely without the telephone. When we are in danger or need help, we use phones to call the police or others. The telephone helps to save peoples lives and keep them safe. The phone has also helped us develop our social relationships with others, even when they are far away or not getting along. From the invention of the telephone, innovations have been made to improve our everyday lifestyles. Such as the cell phone which is very popular. Cell phones can be used for safety and for fun but beware of running up the bills. Another innovation is the internet. The internet was first connected to run through phone lines. And without the telephone the internet might have never been invented. The internet is also in our...
pages: 2 (words: 434)
comments: 2
added: 02/20/2012
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