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Many people compare, fairly or no, Cormac McCarthy's "All the Pretty Horses" to William Faulkner's literary work. What is neglected is the strain of Flannery O'Connor that runs throughout the novel as well. At any rate, "Horses" more than stands on its own as a startling achievement. It's prose is more accessible than Faulkner, and its themes less esoteric than O'Connor. "Horses" is an immaculate novel, dealing with the extreme facets of the everyday and the ways in which people become who they are. John Grady Cole, a 16 year old boy, dispossessed of his family lands, wanders off into Mexico, accompanied by Lacey Rawlins, a close friend. Astride their trusted horses, Redbo and Junior, the two young men ride, searching for occupation and meaning. It may be somewhat idealistic that two ranch-hands like Cole and Rawlins should ride about, discussing throughout the novel things like the profundities of religion, life, and human relationships on so advanced a level, but McCarthy's grasp of vernacular - English and Spanish - makes the whole completely palatable. McCarthy's writing technique leaves nothing to be desired - his evocative use of landscape draws the Texas-Mexico scenery off the page and into immediate experience. Impressionistic and yet utterly tangible, the cold of the evenings and the heat of the days is described as it is felt. McCarthy's characterization is just as remarkable. Minor characters like the various groups of laborers met along the way, Perez the mysteriously powerful political exile/prisoner, or children bathing in a ditch - all bring realism and depth to Cole's struggle into selfhood. The most wonderful thing about "Horses" is that McCarthy doesn't beat you over the head with his major themes - they exist as constant undercurrents - humanity's relationship to tradition, the divine, to each other - these are the elements that...
pages: 2 (words: 402)
comments: 1
added: 10/31/2011
American Presidency Cyle Parker Dr. Mark Leeper December 12th 2007 All the Worlds' a Stage; A Foreign Policy FOR America? In depth look at Presidential Policies and Action between the United States & neighboring Soviet nations in the 21st Century Often on the world stage, the relationships and tensions that play out between the superpowers of the globe has always been complex. How each leader of each respected nation handles these crises sets the foundation from which future leaders will derive effective solutions. There is the natural inclination to achieve dominance on the world stage, while trying to keep a stable relationship with neighboring world powers. The United States and the USSR had been recognized as superpowers since the end of World War II. "Boosting America into a foreign policy arms race, the United States' Manhattan Project led to atomic bombs being dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945." (Cohen, 20) In 1949, the USSR surprised the world by breaking the United States' monopoly on atomic weapons by exploding their own atomic bomb. In 1952, the United States developed and exploded a thermonuclear weapon, also known as the hydrogen bomb. In the following year, the USSR followed suit by detonating their hydrogen bomb. On a global playground for men with big guns, quickly it was realized that our two countries had major ideological differences. The American system of free market capitalism was in stark contrast to Soviet communism. (Cohen 54, 84) The American economy was built, made and sustained by self-made men who had brought themselves from "rags-to-riches". This stereotype was further perpetuated by American authors of the time and living examples of true life heroes of American industry such as John D. Rockefeller and Andrew Carnegie. The USSR's communist ideology was based on the belief that every person should have the same social status as everyone...
pages: 12 (words: 3169)
comments: 0
added: 12/18/2011
"Not one person telephoned the police during the assault; one witness called after the woman was dead" (Gansberg 86). Martin Gansberg's essay, "Thirty-Eight Who Saw Murder Didn't Call the Police," describes a true account of witnesses allowing the death of a neighbor and friend. In this essay Gasberg uses various techniques, including language and tone, to catch the readers attention. Martin Gansberg begins his essay by luring the reader through the use of manipulative techniques: the author attempts to make the reader angry, shows the reader an apathetic public, and also forces the reader to consider what he/she would do. "Chief Inspector Lussen said, "If we had been called when he first attacked, the woman might not be dead now,"" (Gansberg 86). Gansberg's use of this dialogue works specifically to try to make the reader furious. The author then demonstrates how much time elapses and how many times the killer leaves and returns to prove that the woman dies because no one steps in. In addition, Gansberg reveals that Miss Genovese is not a stranger to the witnesses or an unknown neighbor; she is a friend who most knew as Kitty. Still, Gansberg shows an apathetic public by emphasizing that not just one person, but several hear and even watch this heinous crime without making the effort to help. There are no calls to the police and no heroic attempts to aid, simply Gansberg asserts, because no one wants to become involved. ""We went to the window to see what was happening," he said, "but the light from our bedroom made it difficult to see the street." The wife still apprehensive, added: "I put out the light and we were able to see better,""(Gansberg 88). Gansberg's characterization of the couple reveals that they even turn out a light to accommodate their...
pages: 3 (words: 814)
comments: 1
added: 11/23/2011
Robert Penn Warren develops the protagonists in All The King's Men by showing how they act in the presence of other central characters, thus revealing them as complex and dynamic characters. Showing the development of the characters instead of simply telling the reader allows the reader more freedom in interpreting their beliefs, motives, actions, and significance in the novel. Throughout various parts of the novel, the character Willie Stark is developed further and further into a complex character. However, Warren does not simply tell the reader information about Willie, it is revealed through his actions when with other characters. In Slade's pool hall, chronologically the first time we see Willie, he refuses to drink beer because "Lucy don't favor drinking… For a fact" (17). Even though Willie was surrounded by influential men who looked down at him, he still refused to drink because his wife disapproved of him drinking. This alerts the reader to the fact that before Willie became the Boss, he was a very moral man who took his wife's requests seriously. At Pappy's farm, the Boss "lifted up [Jack's] coattail and pulled out the bottle" of alcohol and took two drinks (30). Now, twelve years after the meeting in Slade's, Willie has shown that he drinks even though both his father and wife disapprove of it. He goes on to say that things have changed and begins to reveal that Lucy is not an important part of his life anymore, and that his moral values have changed. The only person with Willie at this time is Jack, which emphasizes that Willie knows he can confide in Jack and look to him for companionship when he needs it. Through Willie's interactions with other characters, Willie is established as a dynamic character with many aspects to his personality and the...
pages: 3 (words: 634)
comments: 0
added: 01/04/2012
Normally, when we think of worlds, the planet Earth comes to mind. What we don't often remember is that the word world can mean more than the Earth. Webster's New World Dictionary states that the true definition of the word world is, "some part of the earth, or an individual experience, outlook.." Keeping that definition in mind, it is true to say that the boys in Lord of the Flies were in their own world, so to speak. And it is also true that every world has its problems. A contemporary psychiatrist wrote , "The problems of the world - and they are chronicled daily in headlines of violence and despair - essentially are the problems of individuals. If individuals can change, the course of the world can change. This is a hope worth sustaining." This quote can apply both to the larger world of the Earth, and the smaller world of the island. On the island, the boys had problems from the beginning. Both Ralph and Jack wanted to be chief and when the rest of the biguns and littluns voted for Ralph, it caused friction between Jack and Ralph. Ralph tried to deal with this problem by appointing Jack the leader of the hunters and keepers of the fire. He had hoped this would repair any damage that had been done to their short friendship. Ralph was doing his duty as the chief and tried to deal with their individual problems. However, this solution ended up doing more harm than good. The friction between Ralph and Jack flourished throughout the book. Jack soon became obsessed with savagery and killing pigs. The only thing he cared about was meat. And Jack does kill a pig; however killing that pig sacrificed the fire and the boys missed a rescue opportunity because the fire went...
pages: 5 (words: 1191)
comments: 1
added: 09/07/2011
In the novel 'Wuthering Heights', Emily Bronte shows how different aspects of themes are presented for a reader's consideration. Some of the important themes in Wuthering Heights are revenge, spiritual feelings between main characters, obsession, selfishness, and responsibility. Although it may seem like a tale of villains and victims, Wuthering Heights' plot is extremely perplexing. The story takes place in northern England in an isolated, rural area. The main characters involved are residents of two opposing households: Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange. It is a tale of a powerful love between two people, which transcends all boundaries, including that between life and death. The author, Emily Bronte, uses parallelism in this novel. Much of what happens in the first half of the story corresponds to events in the second half. This parallelism extends also to the characters; the first generation of characters is comparable to the second generation. In many ways these characters are duplicates of each other and they share many traits. This is not the case for Catherine Earnshaw and Cathy Linton, a mother and her daughter. The contrast between these two characters is one of the key themes in the novel. They are different in numerous aspects of their personalities and lifestyles. Catherine Earnshaw and Cathy Linton differ a great deal when it comes to their family life. Catherine's father did not love her because she was forever misbehaving. He once told her "Nay Cathy, I cannot love thee; thou'rt worse than thy brother. Go, say thy prayers, child, and ask god's pardon. I doubt thy mother and I must rue the day we ever reared thee!" It could be argued that Catherine is slightly victimised because her father does not appear to love her, but the reason for this is her misbehaviour. In relating the tale to Lockwood, Nelly noted...
pages: 9 (words: 2452)
comments: 1
added: 07/10/2011
Literary works of the past revolve around conflicts of the main characters. In several literary works, the downfall of the main character was often resulted by a major flaw. When men are usually the main characters their flaws can often be attributed by a woman. This is the time or moment when the male, main character has let his guard down. Women seeming as innocent and pure beings often can cause the male, main character to cloud their judgment In Lanval, by Marie de France, The Wife of Bath's Tale by Chaucer, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight , and Othello by William Shakespeare are four literary works that cloud male characters' rational. Women were the current themes running through these works and often caused the main character great obstacles because of traits they possess. Often, women were looked on as one-dimensional flat characters incapable of change and represented everything that was righteous, pure and innocent. However, in the above literary works, authors such as Chauncer and William Shakespeare broke the normality by placing the woman character at the center of every conflict of the male character. Each woman contributed to the rise or downfall of a character, making some kind of significant impact in the lives of the male character. In Lanval, by Marie de France, women are the controlling factor leading to the rise and fall of the knight, Lanval. Lanval is overwhelmed by the fairy queen who is a supernatural being in the story. Lanval "promised her that he would do whatever thing she told him to"(Kempe 130). The author repeatedly tells the audience the manner in which Lanval has taken on since he has met up with this supernatural being. Lanval does not even give into the queen wishes which reinforces the magical hold that the fairy queen has over Lanval. Lanval tells the queen "hold me excused because your love must be refused" (132). The queen has...
pages: 7 (words: 1735)
comments: 1
added: 11/11/2011
Sutton Hoo: In 1939, in Sutton Hoo in Suffolk, England, archaeologists discovered a treasure that had been under the earth for thirteen hundred years. This enormous ship-grave contained the imprint of a huge wooden ship and a cast treasure trove—all of which had been buried with a great king or noble warrior. There was no trace left of the king or warrior himself, but his sword lay there, along with other meticulously decorated treasures of gold, silver, and bronze—his purse full of coins, helmet, buckle, serving vessels, and harp. This grave can't help but remind us of the huge burial mound erected in memory of the king Beowulf. Compare to Beowulf: This was a 'heroic' age: the surviving stories and poems make this clear. The greatest virtue was loyalty to one's lord: the warrior shared the spoils of battle, but he was also willing to die for his lord - indeed it was considered a disgrace to leave the field of battle if one's chief were dead. When the battle was over you chased down any fleeing foe and exacted blood vengeance for your own slain warriors. This spirit is reflected in both the poetry and prose of the Anglo-Saxons, even long after Christianity had become firmly established in England. And war has left its remains in the archaeological record, in the form of innumerable weapons buried in the graves of warriors, and even on occasion, those of kings. What do the treasures show about life of the period? : I believe that the treasure that was found about this time period indicates to us that during this period warriors and kings were very great. The common folks would worship and do anything for these great leaders. Kings and warriors were very wealthy people. Community structure: In most of England, the Anglo-Saxons tended to live close to...
pages: 2 (words: 521)
comments: 1
added: 12/09/2011
Just mention Lucy, and everyone knows who you're talking about. Lucille Ball is without a doubt the world's greatest actress and the most famous redhead. She is remembered most for her famous TV character, Lucy Ricardo, but there was more to her than just the famous character she portrayed on I Love Lucy. Lucille could play all types of roles, including drama, comedy, and musical. There was much more to her than what people thought. Her film career began with bit parts in the early 1930's. Lucille was frequently cast in comedies because she was so good at physical comedy. She would do anything to get a laugh, and she didn't care if she looked different or did something out of the ordinary. The only thing Lucille cared about was actually being comical and making people laugh. Even though she was a successful comedienne, Lucille wanted very much to be recognized as a dramatic actress. She wasn't offered many dramatic roles during her career, but Lucille did have a few opportunities to prove her talent as a dramatic actress. In 1942, she starred in The Big Street, and her performance was highly successful and received rave reviews. Lucille wanted to be cast in more dramas, but she didn't have much luck. The public loved her most when she was doing comedy, and it became quite clear that people didn't want to see Lucille Ball as a drama queen. They wanted to see her as the Queen of Comedy and nothing else. She also wanted to do musicals, but Lucille was only given two opportunities. In 1960, she appeared in the Broadway show Wildcat. Then, she starred in the film version of Mame in 1973. Mame was thought to be her last film, but it wasn't. Lucille shocked everyone when she appeared as a bag lady in...
pages: 2 (words: 390)
comments: 1
added: 11/14/2011
Imagine a world where teenagers were given all the freedom they wanted and that there was no guidance for them nor were parented properly. There would be all sorts of consequences. Below are just a few: • Use of alcohol and drugs • Stealing or theft • Behaviour can become disrespectful or defiant • Skipping School • Demanding and selfish attitude • Disregard for rules, responsibilities and family functioning • Poor study behaviour and skills • Becoming destructive, threatening or violent behaviour • Becoming involved in high risk and reckless activities • Grades and school performance dropping • Erratic or emotional unstable behaviour • Becoming unfocused or disruptive behaviour in school Teenagers need guidance and good parenting. Many factors affect outcomes in teenagers. Personal resources, the characteristics of the child, and the stress or support parents get from school, family, and community all enter into the results. Peer pressure can be a very positive force. Teenagers normally choose friends with similar values and tastes to theirs. Parents should still retain the major influence over the child's life. Research shows that parents who monitor their children can help prevent a number of risky behaviours. Monitoring also gives teenagers the message that with increasing privileges comes increasing responsibilities. Parental monitoring means establishing guidelines and limits for your child in order to keep track of what is going on in his or her social world. It means knowing: • where your kids are • who they are with • what kinds of activities have been planned • how they will get there and back again. Sometimes they will complain that parents do not trust them or that they are being unreasonable. This is not the case, it just means that the parents care and they should know. There is a myth that if teenagers were given the freedom they wanted, they would prefer their friends to their parents. They would spend less time...
pages: 3 (words: 778)
comments: 3
added: 01/08/2012
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