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The Arts and Crafts Movement of the late nineteenth century was an attempt to improve society by creating objects and architecture of a more worthwhile nature. The movement began in England in the 1870's and soon spread to the United States where it was widely employed in the arts and in architecture. Advocates promoted its use among the middle class. Its continued endorsement among all social classes was seen as an empowerment to the poor who had suffered so much during the previous period of industrialization. The end of the nineteenth century had produced a huge rift in society. The benefits of industry had resulted in the creation of an upper class with incredible financial power, and a lower class of extremely depleted means. This system was held in place by a vicious circle. The upper class held control of the factories in which the lower classes worked. These profit-minded people, driven by their desire to increase their fortunes, viewed their employees as just another one of their machines. With increased profit and efficiency as their primary goals, the owners promoted and employed policies that created working conditions that were deplorable to say the least. Work had become a listless enterprise with no other purpose than the betterment of the boss. It held no joy or satisfaction, but was essential for the minimal wages it provided. This division of the classes is clearly indicated in Edward Bellamy's 1888 future retrospective Looking Backward. The rich were well educated. Their life was one of leisure and dependence. They produced nothing themselves but depended on their employees for all their material goods. The affluent seemed to possess a sense of manifest destiny concerning the luxuries and privileges they enjoyed. Although they had done nothing to produce their wealth, they strongly felt they were entitled to...
pages: 7 (words: 1877)
comments: 0
added: 02/08/2012
Arts and Humanities in a Changing World What are arts and humanities? Simply stated, they distinguish us as human beings from the rest of beasts. The human race alone has been molded and shaped throughout centuries by looking at the intriguing things around them, or the beautiful concepts inside of them and expressing them in the form in a piece of art. But how do they really affect our daily lives as it is today. To a certain extent, we cannot fully appreciate what role arts and humanities plays in daily life, until we see the consequences of a generation without it. Arts and Humanities in a Changing World What are arts and humanities? Simply stated, they distinguish us as human beings from the rest of beasts. The human race alone has been molded and shaped throughout centuries by looking at the intriguing things around them, or the beautiful concepts inside of them and expressing them in the form in a piece of art. But how do they really affect our daily lives as it is today. To a certain extent, we cannot fully appreciate what role arts and humanities plays in daily life, until we see the consequences of a generation without it. Humanities define us as the human race, and the condition and quality of being human. Humanities opened up critical branches of knowledge from philosophy, literature, art, to liberal arts and understanding of the human thought. The humanities have connected people from all different backgrounds, for example many people in India love watching American films, and, accordingly, many Americans enjoy foreign film. It is not just through film that people from different cultures can connect, it is through literature, music, and other forms of art. People of different ages can share the same interests, political views, and opinions. All of these...
pages: 3 (words: 784)
comments: 2
added: 12/02/2011
Both "The Beggar Woman" and "I Wanna Be Yours" have a great deal to say on human relationships, both Compare and contrast at least two poems from the Hearts and Partner's section, exploring what they both have to say on human relationships showing off the vulnerability of people when they are in love and sometimes the lust. In the following essay I will explore the content, language and structure, comparing them and contrasting them. Firstly, both poems use vulnerability. "The Beggar Woman" heavily relies on the vulnerability where a hunter is used to display vulnerability here as he sees a beggar woman that looks vulnerable, but she in fact quite the opposite, and he is the most vulnerable one as the hunter finds out when he is left with the "burden placed upon his shoulders". "I Wanna Be Yours" also uses much vulnerability as the person completely puts himself in the other person's hands, making the devoted person completely vulnerable and absolutely open to whatever the other person might 'have in store' for the other person. The other element that both the poems discuss is control. In "The Beggar Woman" the hunter thinks that he is in control, but the beggar woman is actually in control from the very start. This is in comparison to "I Wanna Be Yours" as the person lays himself open to attack from the other person by giving the person complete control. However, "The Beggar Woman" displays other elements within human relationships. It shows that it is not a true relationship between the two people, as all that the hunter is interested in is 'having a good time', and the beggar woman is only interested in 'disposing' of the "burden upon her back". Whereas "I Wanna Be Yours" depicts the desperation and the devotion and the fact that...
pages: 3 (words: 698)
comments: 1
added: 11/19/2011
communication over the telephone they hardly ever know who their neighbours are,& meet friends only if granted appointment over telephone . Quite paradoxically,the telephone , an instrument that has made communication so much faster and so much more efficient, is causing lesser direct communication and therefore loneliness in mankind. A similar example is of the television. The television is informative,shows diverse areas of the world and by its widespread viewership has succeeded in shrinking the world in terms of mental distance. Sitting in the comfort of our houses- we can see the Russian taiga, Indian snake charmers,new Japanese technology and follow the American presidential elections all within button-clicks of each other. But the very idea of living life inside our houses, getting to see so much of the world from within the confines of our couches is counterproductive- since our motivation to go out and meet other people is lessened. Again, an instrument that has made the world smaller has distanced us from fellow human beings. All these new inventions have revolutionised our lives. But maybe we as human beings were not mentally prepared to face them. Human beings have a very basic need to feel togetherness with a similar being- to feel joy,ecstasy together; to be able to share bitterness,sorrow. We depend on each other to understand and tackle our emotions and even to experience them better. The above examples i.e. the television and telephone are but poor substitutes for sharing and experiencing feelings with another human being.We as human beings have always welcomed technology and the comforts it brings with it, but maybe we did not delve into the pitfalls of modern technology. As a result of this rapidly developing technology in every field today, most people have very full lives- full of dealing with and getting help from sophisticated machines.They...
pages: 2 (words: 377)
comments: 0
added: 12/20/2011
Introduction The architectural movements of the twentieth century have produced numerous landmark building of immense historical significance. Modernism has become a term that requires definition, in architecture and other disciplines. "Bauhaus modernism" is characterized in terms of period, location, ideas, and formal considerations. The contribution of Modernism and modern deign would traced back to The Bauhaus and its founder Walter Gropius. Apart from the central iconic buildings, there has many symbolic importance achieves that goes well beyond the architecture. WALTER GROPIUS (1883-1969) Walter Gropius was born in Berlin in 1883, he came from a family of architects, designed the Bauhaus after an apprenticeship in the office of Peter Behrens. Gropius was appointed Director of the Bauhaus in1919 where established in Weimar, Germany. His early design, with his long-time partner ADOLF Meyer, for the Chicago Tribune Tower (1922) PRESAGES THE International Style, but his Fagus Shoe Factory ¡V also designed with Meyer- precedes and predicts the Bauhaus. Designed and built between 1911 and 1925, the Fagus Factory bears pronounced similarities to the Bauhaus, although it relied structurally on brick rather than concrete. It is a serious, purposeful structure which was intended reflect its mission; with its concentrated focus on education artists and designers to produce design work for the new modern industrial age. The building embraced at once both artistry and technology and as such it had a symbolic importance that went beyond the structure itself. From 1938 to 1941, he worked on a series of houses with Marcel Breuer and in 1945 he founded "The Architect's Collaborative" in USA. It is believed that Gropius created innovative designs that borrowed materials and methods of construction from modern technology. There were many other masterpieces that created by Gropius such as Gropius House, Lincoln, Massachusetts in 1937, Harvard Graduate Center, Cambridge in 1950. The stylistic simplicity...
pages: 4 (words: 925)
comments: 1
added: 10/22/2011
In 1867 when Frank Lloyd Wright was born into this world, the history of architecture from all over the world was forever changed in many ways. Frank Lloyd Wright always had a reverence for nature and preached the beauty of native materials and insisted that buildings grow naturally from their surroundings. Wright always had a positive perspective on all his designs. He was never a destructive architect and just wiped out all the trees and landscape to create a house. Frank Lloyd Wright designed his buildings to be lived in and experienced in person, not to be seen in drawings and photographs. All of Wrights' styles including the Prairie, International United States of North America and Guggenheim all had a quality of conservation, preservation, and modernism that would support nature and the home and office buyers in the 20th century. The buildings that Wright built over his career vary so drastically from one another that it is difficult to describe exactly what the "Wright style" is. This is because there is no real style, but a design principal that they are all based on. It is the embodiment of Wright's principles that are seen, and the principle of organic design is the tread binding them all together He extolled human values, and his architecture did likewise. However different each of his works is from any other, however unique in beauty and originality, they have grown out of certain basic principles. Organic architecture- natural to the time and place for which it is designed, natural to the man for whom it is built- is in fact architecture of basic principles. All of his styles that he created were so modern and ahead of his time. In addition to all of his modern designs, he was the first architect to design a...
pages: 9 (words: 2353)
comments: 0
added: 01/17/2012
The best example of terrorism in the present day was the attack on the Americans on September 11th when the world trade center was destroyed. It certainly caught the attention of the world and succeeded in its goal. Terrorism is defined as using terror-inspiring methods of governing: is this a productive political strategy? Terrorists usually campaign for their political view to be enforced. By drastic, extreme methods, such as the September 11th attack, terrorists are able to inspire fear and make their views known in effective ways. USA civilians mourned the loss of life on September 11th but they also mourned over their loss of faith in the system that protects them from any attack. This fear was created by terrorism. Action taken by terrorists is made more significant by the inevitable publicity terrorists crave. Gaining the public eye allows terrorists to emphasize the political point they are campaigning about well, which is exactly the desired effect of terrorist attacks. It is evident that terrorism is a successful means of displaying a message because US President George Bush made clear the motive of the suicide bombers on September 11th. He advertised their cause for them. A “war on terrorism” is almost impossible as terrorism is what might be called an abstract concept. Terrorism cannot be demolished through plain hand-to-hand combat, as the USA discovered in the Vietnam War against the communist guerrillas. Terrorism can only be abolished by the causes of terrorism being abolished, making the world a place free of grievances, which is almost impossible to achieve. Certain terrorist movements can be combated by intelligence agencies. However, terrorist operations ensure that their plans will not be known by many people, so it is extremely difficult for the intelligence agencies to find out what they are doing. This method of terrorist organisation is...
pages: 2 (words: 408)
comments: 2
added: 04/29/2011
History has shown that developing countries face many obstacles, one of which is disease. Diseases have had devastating effects on civilizations. The Roman Empire, Great Britain, China, and The United States all have had historical plagues that have killed thousands. The diseases that were so devastating to our past civilizations can now be seen in new civilizations, but in other forms. In the world today, nations like the United States and Great Britain have developed to a level where disease can be fought and prevented. Unfortunately, other nations have yet to develop to such a level. Even with treatment from other nations many nations still cannot afford the treatment needed. But, as millions die in South Africa each year, who is socially responsible or more importantly, who is going to pay for it? The South African government appears to be the reason for much of their problems. The South African government has failed at any attempt to stop their epidemic and has resisted their need for help. Since the South African government has neglected its own people outside measures appear to be needed. This has left the social responsibility to the world. The costs and efforts of this battle are tremendous and will take years along with billions of dollars to fight. In order to take on such a battle nations will need to unite and fight as one. Organizations like the United Nations and World Health Organization have already started this battle. With the support from pharmaceutical companies and their nations, the battle can be won. In doing so, the needs of all the groups must be considered. No burden should be left on the shoulders of any single entity. Pharmaceutical companies appear to be willing to cut the costs of their drugs to a rate that is not beneficial for them,...
pages: 2 (words: 443)
comments: 1
added: 04/29/2011
Freshman year of high school it dawned on me. “What I am going to do with my life? What exactly am I going to do to change the word, make a difference, to revolutionize?” The first answer that came to my mind was music, an overwhelming passion for the arts to be blunt. Music and theater have been a part of my life since, well, as long as I can remember. Through music I discovered a whole new way to view the world. I realized that everything has a song or a dance and very special few people could make others view the world through a song and I want to be one to make others hear that song. Some have asked “Don’t you want to do something meaningful with your life?” Music is an entertainment, a therapy, and educational. To me, what could be more meaningful than spreading the joy of music and the arts to others. Every show I have seen, whether dance, or theater, has inspired me to change. Change a part of my life or change a part of my community. At a young age I the Broadway drama Mornings At Seven, and I was reminded of the importance of family and the idea of loving unconditionally. After walking out of the theater I wondered to myself, “Wow, if this production inspired me, imagine how it could have touched the other 599 people in the audience.” It was at that moment when I realized that this is what I need to do for the rest of my life. Touch lives through art. Ever since that dawning moment I have been hard at work at achieving my goals. From vocal training to drama classes I have worked extremely hard to achieving my goal of becoming a performance artist....
pages: 2 (words: 547)
comments: 1
added: 03/16/2011
Describe your career aspirations and why you have decided to enter Laurier's MBA program at this time. Upon graduating from university with a degree in mathematics, I embarked upon a career in consulting. I continued my education by enrolling in the Association of Investment Management of Research’s Chartered Financial Analyst program and successfully passed the first of three exams: Level I. While preparing and studying for this exam, I was concurrently gaining some exposure to the Financial Accounting division within my company, Hewitt Associates, and realized that my strength was in finance. I quickly became passionate about the subject and with much introspection, I realized that my true interests lay in the path of finance and accounting. Having a mathematical background, I have always been engaged with numbers and I believe that finance, coupled with accounting, would be an excellent outlet for my creative abilities. One might ask, “But why would you need an MBA?” My response would be that without the education and specialization that comes with a Laurier MBA-CMA, it would be quite difficult to enter my role of choice: Financial Accountant Analyst at Hewitt, which requires a CMA designation and prefers an MBA degree. Furthermore, the leading companies, like Hewitt and Ernst and Young, typically require an MBA and/or a CMA degree for managerial positions like Financial Planning & Analysis manager. Without the specialized financial accounting and management skills that would come with an MBA-CMA, I believe that it would take a long time to make my career move. My research of the school (from the Canadian Business’s most recent survey of Canadian MBA programs and What’s in a MBA? The Complete Guide to MBA and Executive MBA Programs in Canada by Rebecca Carpenter) has indicated that Laurier graduates speak highly of the specialized and integrated nature of the...
pages: 2 (words: 422)
comments: 2
added: 03/16/2011
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