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ENGLISH EXT TASK 1 - "Individual and Society" ("A Doll House") The word individual is used when referring to a single human being. In society, an individual is particular person, who is considered special, has a distinct character, and possesses a uniqueness that sets them apart from every other person. Although the concept of individuality seems to suggest difference and separation, all humans are influenced by their environment. Is there such a thing as an individual in society? Or are we all just products of our time, and the society in which we live? Henric Ibsen explores this concept through his play; "A Dolls House". Ibsen's play was set in the 19th century, and reflects many aspects of the society at the time, one of the most important being, the role of women. Throughout my speech I am going to explore the role of women in 19th century society and its relation to the topic; "The individual and society". In the 19th century, British women were expected to marry and have children. The laws were based on the idea that women would get married and that their husbands would take care of them. When a woman got married, her wealth was passed to her husband. If a woman worked after marriage, her earnings also belonged to her husband. Women would usually not work and had no say in matters of business or finance. The idea was, that upper and middle class women had to stay dependent on a man: first as a daughter and later as a wife. In Victorian times, a woman's life wasn't her own, it was dedicated to her husband, children, and looking after the home. For a woman, marriage meant a life of subservience. They were expected to present themselves in a manner that was both visually pleasing and endearing...
pages: 3 (words: 772)
comments: 0
added: 01/30/2012
'When Sometimes She Imagined Herself Like Her Mother': The Contrasting Responses Of Cam And Mrs. Ramsay To The Role Of The Angel In The House. Cam is a striking character because of both her resistance to her mother's promotion of the Angel in the House and her struggle to come to terms with her own identity as having been influenced by this AngelOne way this meaning makes itself apparent in To the Lighthouse is through an analysis of the individual responses of Mrs. Ramsay and Cam to the role of the Angel in the House. Enacting the Angel role requires one to relinquish her independence. Mrs. Ramsay sacrifices her independence, enacts the Angel role, and attempts to educate Cam to also relinquish her independence so as to adopt the Angel role as her own. Cam, however, is a rebellious daughter who struggles with her mother's teachings and eventually responds to them by refusing to enact the Angel role. In doing so, she envisions and takes a first crucial step towards creating a hopeful future in which a modern woman may assert her independence, pursue her individual, unique cause, and surmount those who attempt to coerce her into what she perceives as the outdated Angel role. Analyzing Cam's refusal to enact the Angel role allows meaning to surface, not just about the text and characters, but about the way enacting roles and refusing to enact roles influences one's sense and perception of her identity. Cam also undergoes a painful process in which she, bothered and tormented by the influence of the Angel role, attempts to come to terms with this influence and to reject this role for herself. I do not propose, necessarily, to read Cam exclusively as Virginia Woolf because although the connections and similarities are too numerous to go unnoticed, they...
pages: 27 (words: 7326)
comments: 1
added: 08/09/2011
Bruce Dawe feels strongly drawn to comment on what he would regard as the social evils of this day.Respond to this statement, referring to at least THREE poems you have studied this year. Bruce Dawe is an Australian poet who often writes about the social evils of today. He expresses strong emotions and morals, through his poetry, on current issues of the society, hence often leaving the reader with many unanswered questions and therefore persuading them to reconsider their values. With the aid of poetic techniques, this is particularly evident in poems such as The Not-so-good Earth, Homecoming and The Wholly Innocent. The Not-so-good Earth, written in 1966 is a dramatic monologue in free verse and concerns the western world's ignorance, disinterestedness and prejudices against Asian countries. Through the title of this poem, hyphenation and the use of the persona, the reader is, in turn left with several thoughts associated with this social issue. The title itself already suggests the poem's dominating interest as it is unambiguous that Dawe is playing with the title of the book The Good Earth, written by Pearl Buck - a novel dealing with a poor Chinese family and their struggles with life, only to become successful in the end through hard work. However, real life situations are extremely different from those experienced in The Good Earth and Dawe acknowledges the reality of life in countries like China. The title of this poem induces the reader to distinguish between the dreams and the reality of the world. It informs the reader in thinking beyond their world and to think critically of themselves and their attitudes towards the unfortunate regions of the world. Throughout this poem, the struggle with life in China is continuing, though the only thing Uncle Billy is concerned about is making the television screen clearer by...
pages: 7 (words: 1825)
comments: 1
added: 10/18/2011
The examination of complicated love in The House Of the Spirits, and Like Water For Chocolate. The purpose of this assignment is to show the importance of complicated love in two of Latin American novels. This theme introduces a great deal of family drama and indeed makes the novel more interesting. Complicated love basically revolves around love that was either incomplete or it did succeed in the end, but after a series of conflicts and complications. This theme helps in the development of the plot. Through it we are taken on a journey of the Latin American culture. This is because the traditions and the different social status lead to all the conflicts in love, and that is why Latin American culture influences this theme in many ways. It also suggests that love does not always win, readers also feel very disappointed by the fact that there is not always a happy ending. Basically it converts a dull love story into a page-turner, and probably this is why both the authors use complicated love in their novels. Both the novels The House Of The Spirits and Like Water For Chocolate provide many examples of unsuccessful love. This theme helps us to compare reality to fiction. In both the novels the authors provide various kinds of love that are complicated. This means love on family relationships. This gives the reader a broad view of how this love revolves from relationship to relationship, and also helps us to compare the consequences and emotions of each feeling. In the novel The House Of The Spirits the author Isabel Allende uses several examples of unsuccessful love. It can be said that Esteban, who is the protagonist of the novel, has been a victim of complicated love more than once. Esteban is greatly in love with Clara,...
pages: 6 (words: 1535)
comments: 0
added: 02/15/2012
Jane Austen was born in 1775 in a small village of Steventon in Hampshire. She was the seventh of eight children and was educated mostly at home. She enjoyed the countryside which is reflected in many of her novels, including Northanger Abbey. Austen was one of the earliest British female novelists and became one of the most well known of her time. Her novels were, and are still, popular for their wit and satirical look at upper- class society in England. Her novels has a descriptive style, often with intrusive narrative and ironic tone. She wrote for arts sake and without the interference of politics and movements of the time. Her characters were ordinary and the language reflected that of everyday life. Jane Austen's uneventful life led to her pessimistic view of middle-class society and the cynicism seen in her novels. She wrote in a time of political turmoil, in the early 1800's the Napoleanic wares were making some monarchs nervous and as a result some censorship of literature occurred. Austen's books were aimed at women as women were the only people who were socially allowed to read novels. Austen's books were considered pure entertainment with no thought to politics or important issues. However, they would not be read by all women, as at the time the middle-class women were generally the only women who had sufficient education to read and understand novels. Middle-class women would also have the money to afford books and the leisure time to read them. In terms of literature, Austen wrote in the period, described as 'Romantic Agony.' The Romantic period of literature occurred from the 1730's to the 1830's. Although many say her plots were too involved with society and human interaction to be part of the Romantic genre. Her novels, although important in the history of British...
pages: 11 (words: 2823)
comments: 0
added: 12/10/2011
Tony Harrison is one of Britain's leading film and theatre poets. He has written for the National Theatre in London, the New York Metropolitan Opera and for the BBC and Channel 4 television. He was born in Leeds, in 1937 and was educated at Leeds Grammar School and Leeds University, where he read Classics and took a diploma in linguistics. Harrison's most vengeful and acclaimed poem 'V' was broadcast on channel 4 television in 1987 2 years after its original publication. 'V' is an extremely long poem in rhyming quatrains deliberately echoing Gray's Elegy in a Country Churchyard. Displaying many similarities to early 19th century poetry with each stanza presented on only 3 lines and is written in the traditional manner of poetry using iambic pentameter consisting of 10 syllables and 5 accents or stresses per line. Giving Harrison's poem "V" a distinct feeling that we get when reading aspects of sonnets and plays by William Shakespeare or Christopher Marlow consider, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day" and "Was this the face that launch'd a thousand ships And burnt the topless towers of Ilium? " When read aloud the style of writing creates a sense of a beat. Although Harrison's "V" is in certain aspects similar to the works of 19th century poetry and is written in iambic pentameter like most of English literature's greatest sonnets and plays. The poem does how ever contain irregularities within the language and also in the setting of the poem. Typical 19th century poetry is usually set within a rural surrounding discussing or outlining non-political issues and focuses its attention more toward the beauty, fragility and brilliance of a rural setting. Harrison's poem "V" is set within an urban community and in a contemporary context outlining political and social issues. Harrison chose...
pages: 3 (words: 717)
comments: 1
added: 11/01/2011
Emma Essay on the social activities& balls, their importance & enjoyability throughout the novel etc. Throughout the novel, we see many ways in which social events & activities revolve around the central characters & the theme of status & marriage. Emma takes part in all of the activities throughout the novel, as she is the one trying to use these activities to match-make & lead others. We see Emma taking part in all of these events whether balls, painting or walking. These are taken as a luxury by Emma, whereas others such as the new arrival Mrs Elton later on in the novel suggests a music group & also attends the picnic & strawberry picking. She is using the social activities to become a more observed & respected member of the community & wants to be seen to interact with the upper class. This shows how social activities hold an importance at this time. Everything seems to revolve throughout marriage in the novel & wherever one of the activities are mentioned, there is a distinct link with a marriage or desired proposal entwined by Emma for other characters. Emma's main objective through the novel is to find Harriet a husband. Emma, in another scheme to connect Miss Smith with Mr. Elton, suggests Harriet sit for a portrait. This was popular among the upper classes, and Emma agrees to paint it herself. Mr. Elton is properly excited, and Emma is sure he is falling in love with Harriet. But his interest lies only in the painter, though she knows nothing of his affections. Mr. Elton only interests himself in Harriet because she is Emma's friend, and he is only interested in the portrait because Emma is painting it. Painting was an elegant & popular art skill that upper classes had the time & privilege to pursue &...
pages: 5 (words: 1368)
comments: 2
added: 10/20/2011
The Fall of The House of Usher is an eerie, imaginative story. The reader is captured by the twisted reality. Many things in the story are unclear to the reader; but no less interesting. For instance, even the conclusion of the story lends it self to argument. Did the house of Usher truly "fall"? Or, is this event simply symbolism? In either case, it makes a dramatic conclusion. Also dramatic is the development of the actual house. It seems to take on a life of its own. The house is painted with mystery. The narrator himself comments on the discerning properties of the aged house; "What was it, I paused to think, what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the house of Usher" (54)? The house is further developed in the narrator's references to the house. "...In this mansion of gloom" (55). Even the surroundings serve the purpose. The narrator describes the landscape surrounding as having, "... an atmosphere which had no affinity with the air of heaven, but which had reeked up from the decayed trees, and the gray wall, and the silent tarn a pestilent and mystic vapor, dull, sluggish, faintly discernible, and leaden hued" (55). This fantastic imagery sets the mood of the twisted events. Roderick Usher complements the forbidding surroundings terrifically. His temperament is declining and he seems incessantly agitated and nervous. And, as it turns out, Roderick's fears are valid. For soon enough, before his weakening eyes, stands the Lady Madeline of Usher. This shocking twist in the story is developed through the book that the narrator is reading. The last line that he reads is, "Madman! I tell you that she now stands without the door" (66)! Without suspecting such an event, the reader soon finds Lady Madeline actually standing...
pages: 8 (words: 1996)
comments: 1
added: 11/10/2011
House of Terror The feeling of terror can be implemented in many ways. Some of the most common are short stories, books, and movies. In the short story "The Fall of the House of Usher," Edgar Allan Poe uses imagery, character description, and tragedy to create terror. Poe shows terror by using imagery. He describes the condition of the house and the feeling the narrator gets when he first enters the house of Usher. The main characters in the story, Roderick and Madeline, are both mentally and physically ill, and have extremely pale, gothic-like appearances. There are also two deaths in the story that compound the feeling of terror because of the circumstances in which they occur. The story is a great example of how the combination of literary element can be brought together to create terror in the story. Many detailed descriptions of objects in and around the house of Usher make the overall feeling of terror rapidly come alive. Poe uses a great deal of imagery described through the eyes of the narrator to reveal his dread of the house of Usher. When the narrator is first approaching the house, the first thing that gets his attention is a great fissure that starts at the roof and extends the full length of the house. Upon entering the house, he travels through the gothic archway and immediately notices the somber tapestries and the blackness of the floor (Poe 237). When he first encounters his old friend Roderick and Roderick's sister Madeline, he is awestruck by their appearance, because they do not even vaguely resemble what he remembers about them. He states, "I gazed upon him with a felling of half of pity, half of awe" (237). Using such imagery Poe amplifies the feeling of terror. The effect of terror is furthered by...
pages: 3 (words: 688)
comments: 1
added: 10/20/2011
"Foreshadowing in one of Poe's Great Tales" Imagine hearing a song or reading a story that suddenly becomes your life and what is going on around you. This happens to one man in "The Fall of the House of Usher." As the story opens, the narrator is traveling to his friend Roderick Usher's home in response to a letter from Roderick. The letter sounded dire and important; therefore he could not deny him the visit (Poe 234). As the narrator arrives at the house, he is confronted with eerie surroundings. Days later, Roderick sings him a ballad about a palace that seems like the very house where they reside. Then, near the end of his visit, he reads a tale of a hero that is closely followed by the strangest coincidence of all. In his work "The Fall of the House of Usher," Edgar Allan Poe makes great use of parallels and foreshadowing to contribute to the overall horror of the story. On the first day of the narrator's visit, he notices many strange similarities between the house and the people who resided within. The area around the house is dark and desolate. Dying hedges and decaying trees are strewn about the landscape. Also, the house lies next to a gloomy, dark tarn. The house itself is much like the landscape. A fungus covers it and it seems "excessively antique" (Poe 236). It contains a fissure that ran from roof to foundation, splitting the house in two. On the interior, it is dark and gloomy and some of the ceiling is out of sight, due to the shadows. The furniture is old and seems uncomfortable. When the narrator meets Roderick and his sister, he finds them to be much like the house. Roderick and his sister have a split personality, much like...
pages: 3 (words: 772)
comments: 0
added: 01/05/2012
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